Means and Ends, Or, Self-training

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Marsh, Capen, Lyon, & Webb, 1839 - Conduct of life - 278 pages

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Page 266 - So dear to Heaven is saintly chastity That, when a soul is found sincerely so, A thousand liveried angels lackey her, Driving far off each thing of sin and guilt...
Page 186 - Therewith bless we God, even the Father ; and therewith curse we men, which are made after the similitude of God.
Page 187 - For in many things we offend all. If any man offend not in word, the same is a perfect man, and able also to bridle the whole body.
Page 138 - ... to all people, that respect will of itself teach those ways of expressing it which he observes most acceptable. Be sure to keep up in him the principles of...
Page 49 - ... blessing (in a sanitary point of view) that the Divine mind could devise. Intelligent employment of body and mind is conducive to health and longevity. As a rule, the laboring classes are exempt from dyspepsia and many of the ills that afflict the idle and sedentary. By muscular exercise the blood is assisted in its course through the smaller vessels and more distant parts of the body, its undue accumulation in the central organs is prevented, the processes of digestion, respiration, secretion...
Page 35 - What a strange Providence that a mother should be taken in the midst of life from her children !' Was it Providence ? No! Providence had assigned her threescore years and ten ; a term long enough to rear her children, and to see her children's children ; but she did not obey the laws on which life depends, and of course she lost it. "A father, too, is cut off in the midst of bis days. He is a useful and distinguished citizen, and eminent in his profession. A general buzz arises on every side: 'What...
Page 236 - But 1 fear, my young friends, that you read the bible much less than you should. The multitude of religious books and tracts have, in some measure, superseded it You are attracted by a story, and, to get a little pure gold you receive a great deal of dross. Many of these books, I know, derive their spirit from the bible ; many of them are useful and delightful ; but let them take a subordinate place, and not encroach on the time you have to give to the reading of the bible. Do not be satisfied to...
Page 144 - This word expressed the most highly refined good breeding, founded less upon a knowledge of ceremonious politeness, though this was not to be omitted, than on the spontaneous modesty, self-denial, and respect for others, which ought to spring from his heart. Besides the grace which this beautiful virtue threw over the habits of social life, it softened down the natural roughness of war, and gradually introduced that indulgent treatment of prisoners which was almost unknown to antiquity. Instances...
Page 245 - ... opportunity for reading than you have. You may often, too, by the superior knowledge of a friend, correct the false impressions you have received. Or, your friend may have read the same book, and then it is a delightful point of sympathy One word before I close this subject, as to the preservalion of your books. If you love them, you will respect them, and unless you arc incorrigibly slovenly and careless, you will not break off...
Page 36 - ... and all is quietly imputed to Providence ! Is there not impiety as well as ignorance in this ? Were the physical laws strictly observed, from generation to generation, there would be an end to the frightful diseases that cut...

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