Talks on Talking

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Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1916 - Conversation - 156 pages

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Page 152 - He makes light of favours while he does them, and seems to be receiving when he is conferring. He never speaks of himself except when compelled, never defends himself by a mere retort; he has no ears for slander or gossip, is scrupulous in imputing motives to those who interfere with him, and interprets everything for the best. He is never mean or little in his disputes, never takes unfair advantage, never mistakes personalities or sharp sayings for arguments, or insinuates evil which he dare not...
Page 134 - SOME in their discourse desire rather commendation of wit in being able to hold all arguments than of judgment in discerning what is true, as if it were a praise to know what might be said and not what should be thought.
Page 151 - The true gentleman in like manner carefully avoids whatever may cause a jar or a jolt in the minds of those with whom he is cast;— all clashing of opinion, or collision of feeling, all restraint, or suspicion, or gloom, or resentment; his great concern being to make every one at their ease and at home.
Page 151 - Hence it is that it is almost a definition of a gentleman to say he is one who never inflicts pain. This description is both refined and, as far as it goes, accurate. He is mainly occupied in merely removing the obstacles which hinder the free and unembarrassed action of those about him; and he concurs with their movements rather than takes the initiative himself.
Page 153 - He knows the weakness of human reason as well as its strength, its province and its limits. If he be an unbeliever he will be too profound and largeminded to ridicule religion or to act against it; he is too wise to be a dogmatist or fanatic in his infidelity. He respects piety and devotion; he even supports institutions as venerable, beautiful or useful to which he does not assent; he honours the ministers of religion and it contents him to decline its mysteries without assailing or denouncing them.
Page 122 - The Lord God hath given me the tongue of the learned, that I should know how to speak a word in season to him that is weary : he wakeneth morning by morning, he wakeneth mine ear to hear as the learned.
Page 50 - My friends, this is the first time I ever met this in the Bible, but I accept it as an evidence of the assertion that we are fearfully and wonderfully made.
Page 154 - He respects piety and devotion ; he even supports institutions as venerable, beautiful, or useful, to which he does not assent ; he honors the ministers of religion, and it contents him to decline its mysteries without assailing or denouncing them. He is a friend of religious toleration, and that, not only because his philosophy has taught him to look on all forms of faith with an impartial eye, but also from the gentleness and effeminacy of feeling, which is the attendant on civilization...
Page 150 - Poets that prick up their ears at their own hideous braying are no better than Asses. Critics in general are venomous Serpents that delight in hissing, and some of them who have got by heart a few technical terms without knowing their meaning are no other than Magpies. I myself, who have crowed to the whole town for near three years...

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