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Tom with his pipe did play with such skill,
That those who heard him could never keep still;
Whenever they heard they began for to dance,
Even pigs on their hind legs would after him

prance.

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As Dolly was milking her cow one day,
Tom took out his pipe and began for to play ;
So Doll and the cow danced “the Cheshire round,
Till the pail was broke, and the milk ran on the

ground.

He met old Dame Trot with a basket of eggs;
He used his pipe, and she used her legs;
She danced about till the eggs were all broke;
She began for to fret, but he laughed at the joke,

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He saw a cross fellow was beating an ass, Heavy laden with pots, pans, dishes, and glass; He took out his pipe and played them a tune, And the jackass's load was lightened full soon.

I ONDON BRIDGE is broken down, L Dance o'er my Lady Lee; London Bridge is broken down,

With a gay lady.

How shall we build it up again?

Dance o'er my Lady Lee; How shall we build it up again?

With a gay lady.

Build it up with silver and gold,

Dance o'er my Lady Lee; Build it up with silver and gold,

With a gay lady.

Silver and gold will be stole away,

Dance o'er my Lady Lee; Silver and gold will be stole away,

With a gay lady.

Build it up with iron and steel,

Dance o'er my Lady Lee; Build it up with iron and steel,

With a gay lady.

Iron and steel will bend and bow,

Dance o'er my Lady Lee;
Iron and steel will bend and bow,

With a gay lady.
Build it up with wood and clay,

Dance o'er my Lady Lee ;
Build it up with wood and clay,

With a gay lady.
Wood and clay will wash away,

Dance o'er my Lady Lee ;
Wood and clay will wash away,

With a gay lady.

Build it up with stone so strong,

Dance o'er my Lady Lee;
Huzza! 'twill last for ages long,

With a gay lady.

| LOVE sixpence, pretty little sixpence, | I love sixpence better than my life; I spent a penny of it, I spent another, .

And took fourpence home to my wife.

Oh, my little fourpence, pretty little fourpence,

I love fourpence better than my life; I spent a penny of it, I spent another,

And I took twopence home to my wife

Oh, my little twopence, my pretty little twopence,

I love twopence better than my life; I spent a penny of it, I spent another,

And I took nothing home to my wife.

Oh, my little nothing, my pretty little nothing,

What will nothing buy for my wife? I have nothing, I spend nothing,

I love nothing better than my wife.

THE north wind doth blow,

And we shall have snow, And what will poor Robin do then?

Poor thing!

He'll sit in a barn,

And to keep himself warm, Will hide his head under his wing.

Poor thing!

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