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THE RIGS O’ BARLEY.

TUNE_" Corn rigs are bonnie.
It was upon a Lammas night,

When corn rigs are bonnie,
Beneath the moon's unclouded light

I hied awa to Annie:
The time flew by wi' tentless heed,

'Till 'tween the late and early;
Wi' sma' persuasion she agreed
To see me thro' the barley.
Corn rigs, and barley rigs,

And corn rigs are bonnie :
I'll ne'er forget that happy night

Amang the rigs wi° Annie.

The sky was blue, the wind was still,

The moon was shining clearlie;
I set her down, wi' right gude will,

Amang the rigs o' barley:

I kent her heart was a' my ain;

I lov'd her most sincerely;
I kiss'd her o'er and o'er again
Amang the rigs o' barley.

Corn rigs, fc.
I lock'd her in my fond embrace;

Her heart was beating rarely:
My blessings on that happy place,

Amang the rigs o' barley! But by the moon and stars so bright,

That shone that hour so clearly! She ay shall bless that happy night Amang the rigs o' barley!

Corn rigs, fc.
I hae been blythe wi' comrades dear;

I hae been merry drinking;
I hae been joyfu' gath’ring gear;

I hae been happy thinking:
But a' the pleasures e'er I saw,

Tho' three times doubled fairly, That happy night was worth them a', Amang the rigs o' barley.

Corn rigs, fc.

LEWIE GORDON.
O SEND Lewie Gordon hame,
And the lad I daurna name;
Though his back be at the wa',
Here's to him that's far awa.

O hon, my Highlandman !
O my bonnie Highlandman,
Weel wou'd I my true love ken
Amang ten thousand Highlandmen.

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This lovely youth, of whom I sing,
Is fitted for to be a king:
On his breast he wears a star,
You'd take him for the god of war.

O hon, &c.
O! to see this princely one
Seated on a royal throne,
Disasters a' would disappear;
Then begins the jub'lee year. *

O hon, &c.

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DINNA THINK, BONNIE LASSIE. O DINNA think, bonnie lassie, I'm gaun to leave thee; Dinna think, bonnie lassie, I'm gaun to leave thee; Dinna think, bonnie lassie, I'm gaun to leave thee; I'll tak a stick into my hand, and come again and see thee.

* “ This air is a proof how one of our Scottish tunes comes to be composed out of another. I have one of the earliest copies of the song, and it has prefixed, “ Tune of Tarry Woo"-of which tune a different set has insensibly varied into a different air.--To a Scotch critic, the pathos of the line,

• Tho' his back be at the wa," must be very striking.-It needs not a Jacobite prejudice to be affected with this song. The supposed author of Lewis Gordon was a Mr. Geddes, priest, at Shenval, in the Ainzie." Burns.

Far's the gate ye hae to gang, dark's the night and eerie, Far's the gate ye hae to gang, dark's the night and eerie, Far's the gate ye hae to gang, dark's the night and eerie, O stay this ae night wi' your love, and dinna gang and

leave me. It's but a night and hauf a day that I'll leave my dearie; But a night and hauf a day that I'll leave my dearie; But a night and hauf a day that I'll leave my dearie; Whene'er the sun gaes west the loch, I'll come again and

see thee. Dinna gang, my bonnie lad, dinna gang and leave me; Dinna gang, my bonnie lad, dinna gang and leave me; When a' the lave are sound asleep I am dull and eerie, And a' the lee-lang night I'm sad, wi' thinking on my

dearie. O dinna think, bonnie lassie, I'm gaun to leave thee; Dinna think, bonnie lassie, I'm gaun to leave thee; Dinna think, bonnie lassie, I'm gaun to leave thee; Whene'er the sun gaes out o' sight I'll come again and

see thee Waves are rising o'er the sea, winds blaw loud and fear

me; Waves are rising o'er the sea, winds blaw loud and fear

me; While the winds and waves do roar, I am wae and

drearie, And gin ye loo me as ye say, ye winna gang and leave

me.

O never mair, bonnie lassie, will I gang and leave thee;
Never mair, bonnie lassie, will I gang and leave thee;
Never mair, bonnie lassie, will I gang and leave thee;
E'en let the warld gae as it will, l'll stay at hame and

cheer thee. Frae his hand he coost his stick, I winna gang and leave

thee; Threw his plaid into the neuk, never can I grieve thee;

Drew his boots, and flang them by, cried, my lass be

cheerie, I'll kiss the tear frae aff thy cheek, and never leave my

dearie.

O LET ME IN THIS AE NIGHT.
O LASSIE, art thou sleeping yet?
Or art thou wauken, I would wit?
For love has bound me hand and foot,
And I would fain be in, jo.
O let me in this ae night,

This ae, ae, ae night;
For pity's sake this ae night,

O rise and let me in, jo.

Out owre the moss, out owre the muir,
I came, this dark and drearie hour,
And here I stand without the door,
Amid the pouring storm, jo.

O let me in, &c.

Thou hear'st the winter wind and weet,
Nae star blinks thro' the driving sleet;
Tak pity on my wearie feet,
And shield me frae the rain, jo.

O let me in, fc.

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