History of India, abridged from the author's larger work

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Page 381 - Council is of opinion that the great object of the British Government ought to be the promotion of European literature and science among the natives of India; and that all the funds appropriated for the purpose of education would be best employed on English education alone.
Page 380 - In professing on the other hand to establish seminaries for the purpose of teaching mere Hindoo or mere Mahomedan literature, you bound yourselves to teach a great deal of what was frivolous, not a little of what was purely mischievous, and a small remainder indeed in which utility was in any way concerned.
Page 492 - I wish for a peaceful term of office. But I cannot forget that in the sky of India, serene as it is, a small cloud may arise, no larger than a man's hand, but which, growing larger and larger, may at last threaten to burst and overwhelm us with ruin.
Page 478 - I take this fitting occasion of recording my strong and deliberate opinion, that in the exercise of a wise and sound policy the British Government is bound not to put aside or neglect such rightful opportunities of acquiring territory or revenue as may from time to time present themselves...
Page 492 - We must not forget that in the sky of India, serene as it is, a small cloud may arise, at first no bigger than a man's hand, but which, growing larger and larger, may at last threaten to burst, and overwhelm us with ruin.
Page 382 - Who, differing in race, in manners, in language, And in religion, Cherish, with equal veneration and gratitude, The memory of his wise, upright, And paternal administration.
Page 144 - A few months after, however, the House of Commons passed a resolution to the effect, " that it is the right of all Englishmen to trade " to the East Indies unless prohibited by Act of Parlia
Page 475 - ... berless princes and people embraced within the vast ' circuit of the empire, if for one day it give countenance to a doubt of the absolute superiority of its arms and of its continued resolution to maintain it.
Page 416 - Dangerous it is ; but if it succeeds, it is worth all risks : the rebels have not fulfilled even one article of the treaty, and I have no confidence in them ; and if by it we can only save our honour, all will be well. At any rate, I would rather suffer a hundred deaths, than live the last six weeks over again.
Page 163 - He received the proposal of having a sum of money for "himself and his household at his will with infinite " pleasure, and the only reflection he made upon leaving " me was: ' Thank God! I shall now have as many "'dancing girls as I please!

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