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Thy God's, and truth's; then, if thou fall'st, O Cromwell,
Thou fall'st a blessed martyr! Serve the king;
And—Prithee, lead me in:
There take an inventory of all I have,
To the last penny; 'tis the king's; my robe,
And my integrity to Heaven, is all
I dare now call mine own. O Cromwell, Cromwell,
Had I but served my God with half the zeal
I served my king, he would not in mine age
Have left me naked to mine enemies !

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Iago. What, are you hurt, lieutenant?
Cassio. Ay, past all surgery.
Iago. Marry, heaven forbid !

Cas. Reputation, reputation, reputation! O, I have lost my 5 reputation! I have lost the immortal part of myself, and what remains is bestial. My reputation, Iago, my reputation !

Iago. As I am an honest man, I thought you had received some bodily wound; there is more sense in that than in reputation.

Reputation is an idle and most false imposition; oft got without 10 merit, and lost without deserving: you have lost no reputation at

all, unless you repute yourself such a loser. What, man! there are ways to recover the general again: you are but now cast in his mood, a punishment more in policy than in malice; even so as one

would beat his offenceless dog to affright an imperious lion: sue to 15 him again, and he's yours.

Cas. I will rather sue to be despised than to deceive so good a commander with so slight, so drunken, and so indiscreet an officer. Drunk? and speak parrot? and squabble? swagger? swear? and

discourse fustian with one's own shadow ? O thou invisible spirit 5 of wine, if thou hast no name to be known by, let us call thee devil!

Iago. What was he that you followed with your sword? What had he done to you?

Cas. I know not. 10 Iago. Is’t possible?

Cas. I remember a mass of things, but nothing distinctly; a quarrel, but nothing wherefore. O God, that men should put an enemy in their mouths to steal away their brains ! that we should,

with joy, pleasance, revel, and applause, transform ourselves into 15 beasts!

Iago. Why, but you are now well enough: how came you thus recovered ?

Cas. It hath pleased the devil drunkenness to give place to the devil wrath: one unperfectness shows me another, to make me 20 frankly despise myself.

Iago. Come, you are too severe a moraler: as the time, the place, and the condition of this country stands, I could heartily wish this had not befallen; but, since it is as it is, mend it for your

own good. 25 Cas. I will ask him for my place again; he shall tell me I am

a drunkard! Had I as many mouths as Hydra, such an answer would stop them all. To be now a sensible man, by and by a fool, and presently a beast! O strange! Every inordinate cup is un

blessed and the ingredient is a devil. 30 Iago. Come, come, good wine is a good familiar creature, if it

be well used : exclaim no more against it. And, good lieutenant, I think you think I love you.

Cas. I have well approved it, sir. I drunk!

Iago. You or any man living may be drunk at a time, nian. 35 I'll tell you what you shall do. Our general's wife is now the gen

eral: I may say so in this respect, for that he hath devoted and given up himself to the contemplation, mark, and denotement of her parts and graces : confess yourself freely to her: importune her

help to put you in your place again: she is of so free, so kind, so 5 apt, so blessed a disposition, she holds it a vice in her goodness not

to do more than she is requested: this broken joint between you and her husband entreat her to splinter; and my fortunes against any lay worth naming, this crack of your love shall grow stronger

than it was before. 10 Cas. You advise me well.

Iago. I protest in the sincerity of love and honest kindness.

Cas. I think it freely; and betimes in the morning I will beseech the virtuous Desdemona to undertake for me: I am des

perate of my fortunes if they check me here. 15

Iago. You are in the right. Good night, lieutenant; I must to the watch.

Cas. Good night, honest Iago.

HELPS TO STUDY

Notes “marry'. -an exclamation-in “fustian”-empty phrasing. deed!

pleasance"-merriment. "cast" -dismissed.

"moraler'-moralizer

Words and Phrases for Discussion "immortal part of my.

"as many mouths as “speak parrot's
Hydra''

"denotement" repute yourselfcrack of your love" "must to the watch"

“false imposition"

self',

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PART II

SELECTIONS FROM GREAT AMERICAN AUTHORS

'He cometh unto you with a tale which holdeth children from play and old men from the chimney corner."

SIR PHILIP SIDNEY,

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