the history of sir charles grandison

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Page 396 - Tell me, O thou whom my soul loveth, where thou feedest, where thou makest thy flock to rest at noon; for why should I be as one that turneth aside by the flocks of thy companions? If thou know not, O thou fairest among women, go thy way forth by the footsteps of the flock, and feed thy kids beside the shepherds
Page 252 - But let concealment like a worm i' th' bud Feed on her damask cheek: she pin'd in thought, And with a green and yellow melancholy, She sat like Patience on a Monument, Smiling at grief.
Page 245 - She never told her love, But let concealment, like a worm i' th' bud, Feed on her damask cheek : she pined in thought ; And, with a green and yellow melancholy, She sat like Patience on a monument, Smiling at grief.
Page 396 - I AM black, but comely, O ye daughters of Jerusalem, as the tents of Kedar, as the curtains of Solomon.
Page 257 - minuter discriminations," a good example being the following treatment of Sir Charles's alterations at Grandison Hall: He has a great taste . . . yet not an expensive one; for he studies situation and convenience, and pretends not to level hills, or to force and distort nature; but to help it, as he finds it, without letting art be seen in his works, where he can possibly avoid it.
Page 165 - ... given up. Sir Charles afterwards addressed himself to me jointly with his sisters. I see, with great pleasure, said he, the happy understanding that there is between you three ladies : it is a demonstration, to me, of surpassing goodness in you all. To express myself in the words of an ingenious man, to whose works your sex, and if yours, ours, are more obliged, than to those of any single man in the British world, ' Great souls by instinct to each other turn, Demand alliance, and in friendship...

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