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THE

INQUIRER.

VOLUME I.

1838.

What saith the Scripture?-Rom. iv. 3.

LONDON:

THOMAS WARD AND CO., 27, PATERNOSTER-ROW,

AND ALL BOOKSELLERS.

WILLIAM TYLER,

PRINTER,

BOLT COURT, FLEET-STREET.

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PREFACE.

IN reviewing the proceedings of the year, now drawing to a close, we trust that we have been enabled, as conductors of THE INQUIRER, to accomplish, to some considerable extent, the important and interesting objects we had in view in commencing this periodical.

We would express our grateful acknowledgments to the many kind friends by whose substantial and effective aid we have been enabled to carry forward our undertaking until the present time; and also wish to acknowledge the good wishes and fellow-feeling evinced by others, who have not yet been prepared actively and openly to co-operate with us. We have pursued our course thus far with less animadversion than might reasonably have been expected; and trust that where we may have failed in fulfilling the desires of those whose judgment we respect, we shall meet with all that candour which is due towards those who sustain the difficult position of Editors, and who have to decide imimpartially respecting the admission of essays submitted to them for publication.

We leave to the judgment of our readers to decide how far we have succeeded in filling up the outline proposed in the Prospectus. In one particular, however, we must admit a considerable deficiency to exist-that of General IntelLIGENCE. Our hopes on this head have been disappointed, as the prospect had been held out to us, in the commencement of our periodical, that it would offer to our friends scattered through the country, an easy, agreeable, and advantageous medium of communication on those subjects of vital and absorbing interest which abound at the present crisis: it has, therefore, been a subject of surprise to us, while we find it has occasioned remark in some quarters, that comparatively so small a portion of interesting intelligence relating to movements within the borders of the Society of Friends has found its way into our pages. Those who have perused the work will readily allow that the defect does not rest with the conductors; and in thus adverting to the subject, we hope an

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