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RAILWAY ACCIDENT.

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reached London, when I got a bed at the Paddington Hotel and slept till 8, and then made my way to Harley Street and got breakfast. It was a merciful escape; and really when one wandered about among those masses of débris covering the line, and saw the engine lying on its side in the field, and people going about tying up their heads and asking for wine and brandy, and all looking scared, one could not but feel how good God had been in averting more mischief. It was happily fine, that is, it did not rain; but it was very dark, and we poked about with lanterns at first, and afterwards lighted great bonfires of the broken carriages. A train was sent from Swindon to take us on board, and we got there pretty well tired, and so much done that I actually swallowed a basin of Swindon soup. It was (to me) the worst part of the .

) accident. There ought to be a row about the affair. The goods train was allowed to leave Wotton Bassett Station 25 minutes after its time, and with an engine too weak to draw the load, and which broke down at the place where we ran into it. My first feeling was, 'Well, here's my accident at last. I have always felt sure I should meet with one, and now I hope it is over."

This was one of the many accidents of his life, attributable, no doubt, to the evil influence of Saturn in his horoscope !

He was not to be intimidated by mobs : one suspects that he was more at ease with an unfriendly rabble at Birmingham, than with a friendly one at Belfast. He

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Remember his constancy in every act which was conformable to reason, and his evenness in all things, and his piety, and the serenity of his countenance, and his sweetness, and his disregard of empty fame, and his efforts to understand things, and how he would never let anything pass without having first most carefully examined it and clearly understood it; and how he bore with those who blamed him unjustly, without blaming them in return; how he did nothing in a hurry, and how he listened not to calumnies; not given to reproach people, nor timid, nor suspicious, nor a sophist; with how little he was satisfied, such as lodging, bed, dress, food, servants; how laborious and patient; how sparing he was in his diet; his firmness and uniformity in his friendships; how he tolerated freedom of speech in those who opposed his opinions; the pleasure that he had when any man showed him anything better; and how pious he was without superstition.

Abercorn, Duke of, Northcote entertained by (Diary), ii. 253
Abyssinian expedition, the, i. 275, 307, 316

Northcote on expenses of, i. 316
Acland, Sir Thomas, i. 319, 320
Acropolis, the (Diary), i. 371
Adderley, Mr, on the franchise (Diary), i. 234
Afghanistan, remarks on, i. 197

troubles in, i. 274, 306
Agricultural holdings, Northcote on, ii. 223
Alabama claims, the, ii. 1
Albert, Prince, and Northcote, i. 82

congratulates Northcote on his entering Parliament, i. 117
Ameer, the, ii. 120, 122
American Congress, a curious custom (Diary), ii. 32
American war, Northcote's views on, i. 183
Andrassy Note, the, ii. 100
Anecdote, singular, in letter from Mrs Northcote, i. 29
Annesley, Lord (Diary), ii, 255
Anstruther Thomson, Colonel, notes on Northcote, i. 11
Antoninus, Northcote compared with, ii. 317
Arab encampment, an (Diary), i. 362
VOL. II.

X

Remember his constancy in every act which was conformable to reason, and his evenness in all things, and his piety, and the serenity of his countenance, and his sweetness, and his disregard of empty fame, and his efforts to understand things, and how he would never let anything pass without having first most carefully examined it and clearly understood it; and how he bore with those who blamed him unjustly, without blaming them in return; how he did nothing in a hurry, and how he listened not to calumnies; not given to reproach people, nor timid, nor suspicious, nor a sophist; with how little he was satisfied, such as lodging, bed, dress, food, servants; how laborious and patient; how sparing he was in his diet; his firmness and uniformity in his friendships; how he tolerated freedom of speech in those who opposed his opinions; the pleasure that he had when any man showed him anything better; and how pious he was without superstition.

INDE X.

Abercorn, Duke of, Northcote entertained by (Diary), ii. 253
Abyssinian expedition, the, i. 275, 307, 316

Northcote on expenses of, i. 316
Acland, Sir Thomas, i. 319, 320
Acropolis, the (Diary), i. 371
Adderley, Mr, on the franchise (Diary), i. 234
Afghanistan, remarks on, i. 197

troubles in, i. 274, 306
Agricultural holdings, Northcote on, ii. 223
Alabama claims, the, ii. 1
Albert, Prince, and Northcote, i. 82

congratulates Northcote on his entering Parliament, i. 117
Ameer, the, ii. 120, 122
American Congress, a curious custom (Diary), ii. 32
American war, Northcote's views on, i. 183
Andrassy Note, the, ü. 100
Anecdote, singular, in letter from Mrs Northcote, i. 29
Annesley, Lord (Diary), ii. 255
Anstruther Thomson, Colonel, notes on Northcote, i. 11
Antoninus, Northcote compared with, ii. 317
Arab encampment, an (Diary), i. 362
VOL. II.

X

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