My Diary in India, in the Year 1858-9, Volume 1

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Routledge, Warne, and Routledge, 1860 - India - 828 pages

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Page 164 - London society, and used the names of people of rank very freely, which, combined with the tone of his remarks, induced me to regard him with suspicion, mingled, I confess, with dislike. He not only mentioned his bonnes fortunes, but expressed a very decided opinion that, unless women were restrained as they were in the East, ' like moths in candlelight, they will fly and get burned.' I never saw or heard anything more of him till some weeks afterwards, when a gentleman rode up to my hut at Cathcart's...
Page 252 - Look for miles and miles away, and still the ocean spreads and the towers of the fairy-city gleam in its midst. Spires of gold glitter in the Sun. Turrets and gilded spheres shine like constellations. There is nothing mean or squalid to be seen. There is a city more vast than Paris as it seems, and more brilliant, lying before us. Is this a city in Oude? Is this the Capital of a semi-barbarous race, erected by a corrupt, effete, and degraded dynasty? I confess I felt inclined to rub my eyes again...
Page 206 - For we will destroy this place, because the cry of them is waxen great before the face of the LORD; and the LORD hath sent us to destroy it.
Page 251 - A vision of palaces, minars, domes, azure and golden, cupolas, colonnades, long facades of fair perspective in pillar and column, terraced roofs, all rising up amid a calm and still ocean of the brightest verdure. Look for miles and miles away, and still the ocean spreads, and the towers of the Fairy city gleam in its midst. Spires of gold glitter in the sun. Turrets and gilded spheres shine like constellations. There is nothing mean or squalid to be seen. There is a city more vast than Paris as...
Page 274 - ... on the rivers, intercept their communications, stop their supplies, cut up their daks and posts, and keep constantly hanging about their camps; give them no rest.
Page 299 - Sikhs rushed into the house — some of the sepoys were still alive, and they were mercifully killed; but for some reason or other which could not be explained, one of their number was dragged out to the sandy plain outside the house. He was pulled by the legs to a convenient place, where he was held down, pricked in the face and body by the bayonets of some of the soldiery, whilst others collected fuel for a small pyre, and, when all was ready, the man was roasted alive!
Page 328 - The men are wild with fury and lust for gold — literally drunk with plunder. Some come out with china vases or mirrors, dash them to pieces on the ground, and return to seek more valuable booty. Others are busy gouging out the precious stones from the stems of pipes, from saddlecloths, or the hilts of swords, or butts of pistols and fire-arms. Some swathe their bodies in stuffs crusted with precious metals and gems; others carry off useless lumber, brass pots, pictures, or vases of jade and china.
Page 220 - when Neill marched from Allahabad" (to the relief of Cawnpore) "his executions were so numerous and so indiscriminate, that one of the officers attached to his column had to remonstrate with him on the ground that if he depopulated the country he could get no supplies for the men.
Page 355 - ... made a note that Outram belonged to the group of men who are great enough to admit their mistakes. One day Russell went to see the Begums and their attendants, who were guarded in the Martiniere. He found them all in one large, low, dark and dirty room, without windows, on the ground floor, and his entrance was the signal for a shrill uplifting of voices and passionate exclamations from the ladies who were crouched round the walls. The Begum herself, a shrivelled old woman, led the chorus, complaining...
Page 163 - Constantinople, and, while stopping at Missirie's Hotel, saw, on several occasions, a handsome slim young man, of darkolive complexion, dressed in an Oriental costume which was new to me, and covered with rings and finery. He spoke French and English, dined at the table...

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