Works: Collected and Edited by James Spedding, Robert Leslie Ellis, and Douglas Denon Heath, Volume 3

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Page 297 - Faithful are the wounds of a friend ; but the kisses of an enemy are deceitful.
Page 348 - And therefore it was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because it doth raise and erect the mind, by submitting the shows of things to the desires of the mind; whereas reason doth buckle and bow the mind unto the nature of things.
Page 485 - Then said some of his disciples among themselves, What is this that he saith unto us, A little while, and ye shall not see me : and again a little while and ye shall see me ; and, Because I go to the Father ? They said therefore, What is this that he saith, A little while ? we cannot tell what he saith.
Page 296 - ... as if there were sought in knowledge a couch whereupon to rest a searching and restless spirit; or a terrace for a wandering and variable mind to walk up and down with a fair prospect; or a tower of state for a proud mind to raise itself upon; or a...
Page 347 - Therefore, because the acts or events of true history have not that magnitude which satisfieth the mind of man, poesy feigneth acts and events greater and more heroical : because true history propoundeth the successes and issues of actions not so agreeable to the merits of virtue and vice, therefore poesy feigns them more just in retribution, and more according to revealed providence...
Page 300 - Surely there is a vein for the silver, And a place for gold where they fine it. Iron is taken out of the earth, And brass is molten out of the stone.
Page 322 - But the images of men's wits and knowledges remain in books, exempted from the wrong of time, and capable of perpetual renovation. Neither are they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions and opinions in succeeding ages...
Page 165 - Then after divers meetings and consults of our whole number, to consider of the former labours and collections, we have three that take care, out of them, to direct new experiments, of a higher light, more penetrating into nature than the former.
Page 333 - The parts of human learning have reference to the three parts of Man's Understanding, which is the seat of learning : History to his Memory, Poesy to his Imagination/ and Philosophy to his Reason.
Page 342 - Blessings are upon the head of the just: but violence covereth the mouth of the wicked. 7: The memory of the just is blessed: but the name of the wicked shall rot.

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