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THE

EVANGELICAL MAGAZINE

AND

MISSIONARY CHRONICLE.

FOR JANUARY, 1837.

MEMOIR OF THE LATE MRS. ANN LLOYD,

OF MALMSBURY.

The lives and deaths of the faithful dis- give. Like many young persons reliciples of Christ, in successive ages, fur- giously educated, though her convictions nish a constantly accumulating testi- were in favour of religion, she was far mony, often more affecting than the most from the experience, in early life, of its elaborate arguments, in favour of Chris- salutary and sanctifying intluence. She tian principles. The memorials of pious found it difficult to relinquish the vaniwomen are equally instructive with those ties of life to which her natural talents of pious men, as they reveal the 'silent and mental vivacity strongly predisposed influence of the religion of the Gospel her; and though her outward conduct in forming the charactèr, and sustaining was exemplary, and her respect for rethe mind under eircumstances, often of ligión great, yet she was painfully condifficulty and trial, unknown and unsus- scious of a melancholy, destitution of the pected by the world. These remarks essential elements of the Christian chamight be amply illustrated by the reli- racter. Many, we fear, who are simigious history and experience of the late larly, situated, but; not so faithful to Mrs. Ann Lloyd, of Abbey House, themselves as she was, are willingly selfMalmsbury, but, from our contracted deceived by these exterior indications of space, we must be satisfied with merely good; they hope that, though they do indicating a few particulars. Her course not claim to be determinately religious, is not the less worthy of notice from her they may be, considered as “ not far having occupied a comparatively retired from the kingdom of God," and are sasphere. It is the great object of Chris- tisfied so to remain ! Meanwhile the tianity to train the mind, not merely for practical habit of their minds is averse great crises and rare emergencies, but from the exercises and engagements of for those more simple and constantly re- the spiritual life; the unchecked power curring duties upon which the true value of evil gradually attains a larger ascendof character, and the proper happiness ency over them; the world, with its of society, must depend. These are cares and temptations, “its true and what have been lost to the world by the false enchantments," engrosses their prevalence of moral evil; and these are supreme regard; and every succeeding what Christianity proposes to restore. month and year floats them to a greater

Mrs. Lloyd possessed an early ac- distance from God, as the retreating quaintance with the leading truths of tide bears the unmoored bark further Scripture; but she soon found that a and yet further from the shore. The life of suffering, into which she was fair promise of religious impression, in early initiated, required better consola- which they too securely trusted, proves, tions than a mere theoretical knowledge at length, to have been but like ihe deof Divine things ever gave, or can ever

ceitful bloom upon unsound fruit,--the VOL. XV.

B

forerunner of an equally hasty decay ; deemer; nor a permanent rest till I get or like the false dawn of the East, beyond these rolling spheres, and dwell only the prelude to still returning dark- in the presence of him who wept that ness.* This is an unhappy state of mind, man might smile, who bled that man as well as a dangerous one, for persons of might never die !....I had this eventhis class, whilst dead to the consolations ing the most awful views of death and of a neglected Gospel, are often painfully eternity. The thought of a separation alive only to its fears. They have light from a husband inestimably dear came sufficient to reveal the extent of their with such force as almost to overwhelm danger, without having Christian prin- me. A separation, final and irrevocable, ciple enough to seek the refuge which appeared in all its horrors, for I seemed the Gospel exhibits, or to surrender certain I could not live many days. This themselves to the only influences which was the first idea that struck me; but, can bring the soul to the enjoyment of agonizing as it was, it gave place to one solid satisfaction and rest. Consequently still more so,-that of being for ever and they have what the apostle calls “

for ever miserable. I never recollect any certain fearful looking for of judgment," feelings so rending, my heart seemed and are something like those who find torn asunder. I retired to bed only to themselves amidst a volcanic soil, the weep, but I could not look to him from distant explosions announcing the un- whom alone peace is obtained : neither seen extended fires upon which they could I adequately see my own vileness tread. Mrs. Lloyd afterwards looked and depravity..... If after all these back upon this period of her history warnings, sent in so much mercy, from with much concern, observing, “ It was

the hand of a Father both kind and through many a year I stood upon a good, yes, infinitely so, I should at last precipice so awful that I shudder at the be found unprepared, how awful, beyond recollection of my danger. Oh, what expression, is the thought! What could an arm was that which held me!" The I plead that judgment should not pass ? following extract from her Journal Plead? Ah, nothing, nothing. Oh, my shows her to have been at this time, soul, lose not this solemn thought, that though idolized by those around her, soon, very soon, thine everlasting doom equally far from happiness and hope.

will be fixed; and that now, yes, now, Again dawns the morning of an

this moment (for the next may be eterother Sabbath, but obscured by dark nity's), is the accepted time, now is the clouds and showers of rain. How swiftly

day of salvation." does time pass away, and yet we throw But God appears to have had designs away our suns as made for sport!' Sab- of mercy towards her, and proceeded to bath suns will, ere long, wax and wane

work out those designs in his own inno more. Very soon shall I close my scrutable way. The worldly blossom eyes upon all terrestrial objects, and was to be blighted, that the spiritual open them in eternity. Oh! eternity,

one might be set; and a cloud was eternity,-awfully solemn, beyond ex- thrown over the prospects of life, that pression, is this one word, in which the the lights and consolations of a higher happiness or misery of millions and my

world might shine upon her spirit. She riads is expressed. To be eternally

had not long entered the marriage relahappy, or eternally miserable, belongs

tion, which took place when she was in to every individual upon the face of the her eighteenth year, before symptoms of glohe. Yet, amidst these awful consi- that malady appeared from which she derations, do I rest (or rather live), for

never recovered. Her residence was I cannot say, under considerations so then fixed at Malmsbury, in Wiltshire, momentous, I rest; rest never will be in the house immediately adjoining the mine here, in any degree, till I am as

venerable ruins of the once magnificent sured of an interest in the great Re

abbey, which is one of the attractive objects in that county to the antiquary

and man of taste. In the same house, # The false dawn. Subah kanzib, the lying or the celebrated Hobbes, the Philosopher false dawn, is a phenomenon common in these eastern countries, consisting in a brightness which

of Malmsbury, as he is called, is said to appears from an hour to half an hour before the true

have lived. At the back of the house It may be some optical decep- the seclusion is perfect, and the view tion depending upon the refraction of the sun's rays, even when he is considerably below the visible ho

exhibits one of those rich and fertile rizon.-frazer's Kuz zilbush.

prospects, in the selection of which the

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dawn commences.

ancient monks and churchmen were pro

• Oh, who could bear life's stormy doom verbial for their skill and judgment.

Did not thy wing of love

Come sweetly wasting through the gloom, Here, happy in the husband of her The peace brauch from above ?' choice, with an eye to discern the beauty “ In the mercies of the past year I of the sylvan scenes around her, and a account my acquaintance with Mr. heart to prize the comforts of her lot, T. as none of the smallest. He has she spent years of bodily suffering, been a spiritual guide to me when which were to be mercifully alleviated I could have received no support from by the consolations of piety. There is any other earthly source: and I am reason to believe, from her Diary and sure, so long as I live, I shall have cause other writings, that it was the shock to bless God that he ever came to which her health received that first dis- Malmsbury. May every blessing he posed her to more serious thoughts upon needs, from the best source, continually religious subjects. It was about this abide with him to support and strengthen time that the Rev. S. Thodey, now of him to perform the pleasure of his Cambridge, visited Malmsbury, at the Lord.” request of the Rev. W. Jay, to supply, Her anticipations of early death, howfor a few Sabbaths, the vacant pulpit, ever, were not realized, as it pleased residing for some weeks with Mr. and God that the shadow should go back Mrs. Lloyd; and it was to his ministry, upon the sun-dial for fifteen years. But combined with his private conversation from this period there was a visible with her upon the topics of personal re- growth in the peace and satisfaction of ligion, that she invariably ascribed her her mind. There were two things by first decided, and, as they happily which, from the time of her conversion proved, permanent religious impres- to her death, she was eminently distinsions. She maintained, till the close of guished; by her anxious efforts to avail lite, an occasional correspondence with herself of all the means which her afflicbim upon points connected with her tion permitted, to promote her own Christian experience; and some other growth in grace, and her great concern letters written under the pressure of for the progress of religion in the minds suffering, and in the immediate prospect of others. Her efforts to promote her of death, furnish ample proofs of the own advancement in the religious life, power of Christianity to sustain the to cultivate the virtues and graces of mind in the darkest hours of human the Christian character, and to secure calamity.

her intellectual improvement, as well To this grateful change in her reli- as confirm her devotional habits, were gious history she refers, in her private constant and unremitting. We find writings, with much interest, under extracted in her note-book, Jeremy date May 7, 1819.

Taylor's beautiful description of the * I am as

a wonder unto many Countess of Carberry, which might, in Surely the hand of the Lord is mighty its leading particulars, with almost lito save. This weak frame still holds teral exactness, be applied to herself. out another year; and though for these “She was early at her repentance; and inne years past the land of affliction towards the latter end of her days grew has pressed so heavily as to lead me to so fast in religion as if she had had a suppose that each would be the last, yet revelation of her approaching end; and am I preserved to see my twenty-ninth therefore that she must go a great way birth-day, the happiest of my life, for in a little time, her discourses were more now I trust I can say that I do love the full of religion, her prayers more freLord. The last letter I received from quent, her charity increasing, her friendmy dear friend, Mr. T. (with an en- ship more communicative, her passions closed tract, most beautifully written more under discipline, — and so she by Robert Hall), was the means em- trimmed her lamp, not knowing that ployed to awaken my languor and in- her night was so near, but that it might difference to the momentous concerns shine also in the day-time, in the temof the soul, which I sincerely pray may ple, and before the altar of incense. not, as heretofore, be as the morning Though she had the greatest judgment, cloud and early dew, but may abide yet, as if she knew nothing of it, she with me continually to cheer my oft had the meanest opinion of herself, and, gloomy path.

like a fair taper, when she shined to all forerunner of an equally hasty decay ; deemer; nor a permanent rest till I get or like the false dawn of the East, -- beyond these rolling spheres, and dwell only the prelude to still returning dark- in the presence of him who wept that ness.* This is an unhappy state of mind, man might smile, who bled that man as well as a dangerous one, for persons of might never die !'.... I had this eventhis class, whilst dead to the consolations ing the most awful views of death and of a neglected Gospel, are often painfully eternity. The thought of a separation alive only to its fears. They have light from a husband inestimably dear came sufficient to reveal the extent of their with such force as almost to overwhelm danger, without having Christian prin- me. A separation, final and irrevocable, ciple enough to seek the refuge which appeared in all its horrors, for I seemed the Gospel exhibits, or to surrender certain I could not live many days. This themselves to the only influences which was the first idea that struck me; but, can bring the soul to the enjoyment of agonizing as it was, it gave place to one solid satisfaction and rest. Consequently still more so,—that of being for ever and they have what the apostle calls “ a for ever miserable. I never recollect any certain fearful looking for of judgment,' feelings so rending, my heart seemed and are something like those who find torn asunder. I retired to bed only to themselves amidst a volcanic soil, the weep, but I could not look to him from distant explosions announcing the un- whom alone peace is obtained : neither seen extended fires upon which they could I adequately see my own vileness tread. Mrs. Lloyd afterwards looked and depravity..... If after all these back upon this period of her history warnings, sent in so much mercy, from with much concern, observing, “ It was the hand of a Father both kind and through many a year I stood upon a good, yes, infinitely so, I should at last precipice so awful that I shudder at the be found unprepared, how awful, beyond recollection of my danger. Oh, what expression, is the thought! What could an arm was that which held me!" The I plead that judgment should not pass ? following extract from her Journal Plead ? Ah, nothing, nothing. Oh, my shows her to have been at this time, soul, lose not this solemn thought, that though idolized by those around her, soon, very soon, thine everlasting doom equally far from happiness and hope.

will be fixed; and that now, yes, now, “ Again dawns the morning of an

this moment (for the next may be eterother Sabbath, but obscured by dark nity's), is the accepted time, now is the clouds and showers of rain. How swiftly day of salvation.” does time pass away, and yet we throw But God appears to have had designs away our suns as made for sport ! Sab- of mercy towards her, and proceeded to bath suns will, ere long, wax and wane

work out those designs in his own inno more. Very soon shall I close my scrutable way. The worldly blossom eyes upon all terrestrial objects, and was to be blighted, that the spiritual open them in eternity. Oh! eternity,

one might be set; and a cloud was eternity, ----awfully solemn, beyond ex

thrown over the prospects of life, that pression, is this one word, in which the

the lights and consolations of a higher happiness or misery of millions and my

world might shine upon her spirit. She riads is expressed. To be eternally

had not long entered the marriage relahappy, or eternally miserable, belongs

tion, which took place when she was in to every individual upon the face of the

her eighteenth year, before symptoms of glohe. Yet, amidst these awful consi- that malady appeared from which she derations, do I rest (or rather live), for

never recovered. Her residence was I cannot say, under considerations so then fixed at Malmsbury, in Wiltshire, momentous, I rest; rest never will be

in the house immediately adjoining the mine here, in any degree, till I am as

venerable ruins of the once maguificent sured of an interest in the great Re

abbey, which is one of the attractive objects in that county to the antiquary

and man of taste. In the same house, * The false dawn. Subah kanzib, the lying or the celebrated Hobbes, the Philosopher false dawn, is a phenomenon common in these

of Malmsbury, as he is called, is said to eastern countries, consisting in a brighiness which appears from an hour to half an hour before the true have lived. At the back of the house dawa commences. It may be some optical decep- the seclusion is perfect, and the view tion dependiug upon the refraction of the sun's rays,

exhibits one of those rich and fertile even wheu he is considerably below the visible horizon-trazer's Kuzziibash.

prospects, in the selection of which the

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ancient monks and churchmen were pro

Oh, who could bear life's stormy doom verbial for their skill and judgment.

Did not thy wing of love

Come sweetly waning through the gloom, Here, happy in the husband of her

The peace branch from above ?' choice, with an eye to discern the beauty “ In the mercies of the past year I of the sylvan scenes around her, and a account my acquaintance with Mr. heart to prize the comforts of her lot, T. as none of the smallest. He has she spent years of bodily suffering, been a spiritual guide to me when which were to be mercifully alleviated I could have received no support from by the consolations of piety. There is any other earthly source:

and I am reason to believe, from her Diary and sure, so long as I live, I shall have cause other writings, that it was the shock to bless God that he ever came to which her health received that first dis- Malmsbury. May every blessing he posed her to more serious thoughts upon needs, from the best source, continually religious subjects. It was about this abide with him to support and strengthen time that the Rev. S. Thodey, now of him to perform the pleasure of his Cambridge, visited Malmsbury, at the Lord.” request of the Rev. W. Jay, to supply, Her anticipations of early death, howfor a few Sabbaths, the vacant pulpit, ever, were not realized, as it pleased residing for some weeks with Mr. and God that the shadow should go back Mrs. Lloyd; and it was to his ministry, upon the sun-dial for fifteen years. But ezinbined with his private conversation from this period there was a visible with her upon the topics of personal re- growth in the peace and satisfaction of ligion, that she invariably ascribed her her mind. There were two things by first decided, and, as they happily which, from the time of her conversion proved, permanent religious impres- to her death, she was eminently distinsions. She maintained, till the close of guished; by her anxious efforts to avail lie, an occasional correspondence with herself of all the means which her afflicbim upon points connected with her tion permitted, to promote her own Christian experience, and some other growth in grace, and her great concern leiters written under the pressure of for the progress of religion in the minds suffering, and in the immediate prospect of others. Her efforts to promote her of death, furnish ample proofs of the own advancement in the religious life, pwer of Christianity to sustain the to cultivate the virtues and graces of mind in the darkest hours of human the Christian character, and to secure calamity.

her intellectual improvement, as well To this grateful change in her reli- as confirm her devotional habits, were gious history she refers, in her private constant and unremitting. We find writings, with much interest, under extracted in her note-book, Jeremy date May 7, 1819.

Taylor's beautiful description of the “I am as a wonder unto many Countess of Carberry, which might, in Surely the hand of the Lord is mighty its leading particulars, with almost lito save. This weak frame still holds teral exactness, be applied to herself. out another year; and though for these “She was early at her repentance; and nine years past the land of afiliction towards the latter end of her days grew has pressed so heavily as to lead me to so fast in religion as if she had had a fuppose that each would be the last, yet revelation of her approaching end ; and am I preserved to see my twenty-ninth therefore that she must go a great way birth-day, the happiest of my life, for in a little time, her discourses were more now I trust I can say that I do love the full of religion, her prayers more freLord. The last letter I received from quent, her charity increasing, her friendmy dear friend, Mr. T. (with an en- ship more communicative, her passions closer tract, most beautifully written more under discipline, - and so she by Robert Hall), was the means em- trimmed her lamp, not knowing that ployed to awaken my languor and in- her night was so near, but that it might difference to the momentous concerns shine also in the day-time, in the temof the soul, which I sincerely pray may ple, and before the altar of incense. not, as heretofore, be as the morning Though she had the greatest judgment, cloud and early dew, but may abide yet, as if she knew nothing of it, she with me continually to cheer my oft had the meanest opinion of herself, and, gloomy path.

like a fair taper, when she shined to all

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