Historical Romances of the Author of Waverley, Volume 18

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A. Constable & Company, 1824
 

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Page 110 - Perfume for a lady's chamber ; Golden quoifs and stomachers, For my lads to give their dears: Pins and poking-sticks of steel. What maids lack from head to heel: Come buy of me, come; come buy, come buy; Buy, lads, or else your lasses cry : Come buy.
Page 11 - ... at the same time, he fixed his eager gaze on the queen's approach, with a mixture of respectful curiosity, and modest yet ardent admiration, which suited so well with his fine features, that the warders, struck with his rich attire and noble countenance, suffered him to approach the ground over which the queen was to pass, somewhat closer than was permitted to ordinary spectators.
Page 19 - They hear farther than you think of," said the queen, graciously, " and have heard of a youth who defended a ford in Shannon against a whole band of wild Irish rebels, until the stream ran purple with their blood and his own." " Some blood I may have lost," said the youth, looking down, " but it was where my best is due ; and that is in your majesty's service.
Page 15 - when Your Majesty's foot touched it, it became a fit mantle for a prince, but far too rich a one for its former owner." The Queen again blushed, and endeavored to cover, by laughing, a slight degree of not unpleasing surprise and confusion. "Heard you ever the like, my lords? The youth's head is turned with reading romances — I must know something of him, that I may send him safe to his friends. What art thou? What is thy name and birth?" "Raleigh is my name, most gracious Queen, the youngest son...
Page 199 - Let me play the lion too : I will roar, that I will do any man's heart good to hear me ; I will roar, that I will make the duke say, "Let him roar again, let him roar again.
Page 63 - Shakspeare no harm. He is a stout man at quarter-staff, and single falchion, though, as I am told, a halting fellow ; and he stood, they say, a tough fight with the rangers of old Sir Thomas Lucy, of Charlecot, when he broke his deer-park and kissed his keeper's daughter.
Page 191 - Warwick, within whose castle (that fairest monument of ancient and chivalrous splendour which yet remains uninjured by time) Elizabeth had passed the previous night, and where she was to tarry until past noon, at that time the general hour of dinner throughout England, after which repast she was to proceed to Kenilworth.
Page 67 - That very time I saw, but thou couldst not, Flying between the cold moon and the earth, Cupid all arm'd : a certain aim he took At a fair vestal throned by the west, And loosed his love-shaft smartly from his bow, As it should pierce a hundred thousand hearts : But I might see young Cupid's fiery shaft Quench'd in the chaste beams of the watery moon, And the imperial votaress passed on, In maiden meditation, fancy-free.
Page 13 - Pensioner, who shewed him considerable respect ; a circumstance which, to persons in his situation, may be considered as an augury of no small consequence. He ushered him into one of the wherries which lay ready to attend the Queen's barge, which was already proceeding up the river, with the advantage of that flood-tide, of which, in the course of their descent, Blount had complained to his associates.
Page 15 - Walter waited patiently until the Queen had done, and then modestly assured her, that gold was still less in his wish than the raiment her majesty had before offered.

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