The History of Greece

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C. and C. Whittingham, sold by T. Tegg, 1826 - Greece - 264 pages

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Page 140 - Lacedaemonians, to avoid the shame of abandoning the body of their king, redoubled their efforts, and a great slaughter ensued on both sides. The Spartans fought with so much fury about the body, that at length they gained their point, and carried it off. Animated by so glorious an advantage, they prepared to return to the charge, which would perhaps have proved successful had the allies seconded their ardour; but the left wing seeing the Lacedaemonian phalanx...
Page 187 - Phenix and Prothutes, the two chief ringleaders of the revolt delivered up to him ; and published by sound of trumpet, a general pardon to all who should come over to him. But the Thebans, by way of insult, demanded to have Philotas and Antipater delivered to them ; and invited, by a declaration, all who were solicitous for the liberty of Greece, to join with them in its defence.
Page 124 - I am accused of corrupting the youth, and of instilling dangerous maxims into them, as well in regard to the worship of the gods, as the rules of government. You know, Athenians, that...
Page 201 - ... at the accusation, appealing to the gods to witness his innocence, sometimes lifting up his hands to heaven, and then throwing himself down by the bedside, and beseeching Alexander to lay aside all fear, and follow his directions without apprehension. For the medicine at first worked so strongly as to drive, so to...
Page 207 - For the rest of the women had been carried to Damascus, with part of Darius's treasure, and all such things as contributed only to the luxury and magnificence of his court. No more than three thousand talents * were found...
Page 125 - Delium, the fear of death should at this time make me abandon that in which the Divine Providence has placed me, by commanding me to pass my life in the study of philosophy for the instruction of myself and others ; this would be a most criminal desertion indeed, and make me highly worthy of being cited before this tribunal, as an impious man who does not believe the gods. Should you resolve to acquit me...
Page 132 - he formed our youth, and taught our children to love their country, and to honour their parents. In this place he gave us his admirable...
Page 125 - I am reproached with abject fear and meanness of spirit for being so busy in imparting my advice to every one in private, and 'for having always avoided to be present in your assemblies to give my counsels to my country. I think I have sufficiently proved my courage and fortitude both in the field, where I have borne arms with you, and in the senate...
Page 132 - The poison then operated more and more. When Socrates found it began to gain upon the heart, uncovering his face, which had been covered, without doubt to prevent any thing from disturbing him in his last moments,
Page 129 - ... that it depended only upon himself to quit the prison ; that the jailor was gained; that he would find the doors open, and offered him a safe retreat in Thessaly. Socrates laughed at this proposal, and asked him, whether he knew any place out of Attica where people did not die...

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