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CLAIMS OF MINISTERS' WIDOWS.

The following List of grants to the Widows of our beloved Brethren will show very distinctly and impressively the powerful claim which the EvangELICAL MAGAZINE has upon the vigorous support of the Pastors, Deacons, and MEMBERS of our Churches. Not that we would at any time rest our claim upon the mere benevolent objects to which the profits of the work are devoted. We firmly believe that, in a Literary and Theological point of view, we may venture a comparison with contemporary Publications. But when we can show, as by the following List, that we are enabled to distribute, in a single year, £1194 among the Widows of 145 of our Brethren, we do think that the EvangELICAL MAGAZINE ought to double its circulation during the present year. Let the effort be made, and it will not fail.

....57.... 8

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M-y

.... 46.... 8

55.... 56....

....47.... 6

GRANTS TO THE WIDOWS OF PIOUS | Name.

Denomination. Age. Sum.
MINISTERS, FOR 1850.

J. G.
Independent

40.... E. H.

Do.

45.... 4 A. J.

Do.
MIDSUMMER DISTRIBUTION.

H. J.

Do.

...80.... 8 ENGLISH WIDOWS.

Do.

58.... 8 Name. Denomination.

M. J.

Age. Sum. H. B.

J.

Do.
Independent. 59., £10

....72.... 8 M. L.

Do.
M. A. B.
Do.

....61.... ....42.... 6

Do. M. A. C.

...73.... Do.

E. W.

.80....10 H, D.

Do.
59....10

SCOTTISH WIDOWS.
E. D.

Do.
56.... 8
J. R.

Independent.
M. G.

Do.
.... 48.... 8
B. S.
Presbyterian

6 E. G. Do.

Do.

6 ....76....10 | E. Y. J. H.

Do.
65....10

IRISTI WIDOW.
E. H.

Do.

72.... 10 A. G. M....... Independent .... 72.... 8 E. J.

Do.
M. J.

Do.
....54.... 8

CHRISTMAS DISTRIBUTION.
S. J.

Do.
46.... 8

ENGLISH WIDOWS.
C. K.
Ch. of England 46.... 8

M. A.

Independent. 54.... 6 A. L. Presbyterian .... 74.... 10

M. B.

Do.

....47.... 8 J. L. Independent. 66....10

S. B.

Do.

57.... 8 S. L.

Do.
....67....10
M. L. B.

Do.

....41.... 8 L. P. M. Do. ...44.... 6

E. C.

Do. ... 77....10 S. M.

Do.
80....10 | A. C.

Do.

.... 67....10 S. P. Ch. of England ..61.... 10 A. C-k

Do.

65....10 M. P. Independent .... 64....10

J.

Do.

82....10 J. R. Do. ...61.... 8

A. C-t Ch. of England 69.... 10 A. E. S. Ch. of England .. 54.... 8

E. C

Independent....70....10
A. S.
Independent 42.... 8

E. D.
Do.

8 E. S.

68....10 | M. D.

Ch. of England ..51.... 8 M. S.

Do.
52.... 8 M. A. D. ...... Independent

48....

8 E. T.

Do.
63....10
M. D.

Do.

56....10 S. W. Ch. of England 62....10

S. A. D.

Do.

61....10 E. J. W. Independent E. E.

....64....10 E. W.

Do.
. 72....10 | A. E.

Do.

....81....10 WELSH WIDOWS.

E. E.

Do.

51.... 8 M. B. Independent...

S. E.

Do.

84....10 M. E.

Do.
57.... 6 A. E-

Do.

..49.... 8 M. G.

Do.
82.... 81 S. E-

Do.

64.... 10 M. G. Do. 8 E. F.

Do.

74....10

..

57....

Do.

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42....

Do.

.... 48.... 4

72....

83....

..60.... 8

42....

....62.... 10 J. W. R.

M. W...

Name.
E. G.
A. G.
E. G.
J. G.
A. G.
L. G.
M. A. G.
A. H.
C. H.
E. H.
A. H.
M. H.
E. H.
J. J.
L. J.
C. J.
M. J.
M. L.
M. A. L.
S. L.
L. A. L.
M. E. M.
M. M.
M, M-t
H. M.
E. N.
E. N.
A. N.
L. P.
S. P.
J. P.
A. R.
E. R.
E. R-e
J. R.
E. C. S.
E. S.
E. S-S
A. T.
A. W.

..51....

Do.

Denomination. Age. Sum. Name.

Denomination. Age. Sum. Independent .. 64....10 | A. R.

Independent 42.... 4 Do. 50.. 8 J. J. R.

Do.

56..
Do.
....61....10 M. W.

Do.
Do.
. 46.... 8

SCOTTISH WIDOWS.
Do.
....76....10

J. B.
Do.
50.... 8

Independent
E. C.
Do.

4
Do. .61....10
M. D.

68.... 8 Do.

Presbyterian
. 67....10
R. G.

Do.
Do.
54.... 8

....78.... 8 W. K.

Do.
Do.

66.... 8
78....10
B. M.

Independent.
Do.
66. 10

84.... 8
E. M.
Do.
57 10

Do.

62.... 8 E. P. Do.

Presbyterian 73.... 8
....55.... 8
M. P.

Independent.
Presbyterian .... 48.... 4

77....10

70.... 8 Independent..

Presbyterian
J. T.

Do.

74.... 8
Do.
.51.... 8

Do.
Do.
45.... 6

..61.... 8
Do. ..55....10
Do. ....58....10

ECCLESTON CHAPEL, PIMLICO.
Do.
62.... 10

ARRANGEMENTS have been made with the
Ch. of England ..53....

8

Rev. James Davis, of Denton, Norfolk, to be-
Independent 80.. 10 come the minister of the above chapel.
Do.

62. 10 Mr. Davis will commence bis labours there Do.

8 (D.v.) on Sunday, April 13th.
Do. ... 67....10
Do.
. 68.... 8

FETTER-LANE CHAPEL.
Do.

46.... 6 The Rev. H. Batchelor, of Leamington, Do.

65.... 10 having accepted the invitation to the pasDo. ....50.... 8

torate of the church meeting in the aboveDo.

85.... 10 named place of worship, and for more than

. 72....10 | twenty years presided over by the Rev. Caleb Do.

60... 8 Morris, has in consequence resigned his former Do.

75.. 10 charge, and will enter upon his new sphere of

69.. 10 labour on the second Sabbath of this present Do. ....86.... 10 month. Do.

....54.... 8 Do.

.61....10 THE Rev. Alfred Crisp was ordained Do.

54.... 8 pastor of the Congregational Church, LongDo.

69....10 den, Shropshire, on the 21st of November, Do. 59 8

1850. 78 10 The church had been formed a few months Do. . 57.... 8 previously by the Rev. Thomas Weaver, of Do. ..58.... 8 Shrewsbury; and now, with the renovated Do. ...56.... 8 chapel, increasing congregation and schools,

both Sabbath and daily, proves the efficiency Donations.

of the self-denying labours of the newly 10

chosen minister and his devoted wife. This 10

is the more gratifying, because but a short WELSH WIDOWS.

time ago the whole place was reduced to utter Independent....86.... 8 destitution. Do.

50....

6 The weather was not very favourable to Do.

the interesting service; but the zeal of the Do. .68.... 8 villagers and their neighbouring friends, did Do.

81.... 8 not allow it to prevent their assembling in Do.

49.... 6 considerable numbers. Do.

71....

8

The Rev. Mr. Thorp delivered the introDo. ..90.... 8 ductory discourse, expository of some parts Do. . 77.... 8 of congregational polity, which, for clearness Do.

81.... 8 of statement, calmness of temper, and conDo.

71.... 8 clusiveness of argument, stood in advanDo. ..71.... 8 tageous contrast to the ill-tempered declaDo. ....71.... 8

mation which it has been our misfortune to Do. 41.... 6 listen to, on some similar occasions.

Do.

M. W...

Do.

S. W.
M. W.
J. W.

M. M.
M. P.

D. D.
M. D.
E. D.
R. D.
J. E.
J. E-8
E. G.
J. H.
A. J.
E. J.
J. J.
M. J.
H. L.
C. P.

an

NEWARK-UPON-TRENT.

The Rev. T. E. Thoresby asked the usual charge to the church, by the Rev. D. Roberts, questions, and an additional one as to the of Carnarvon. At two o'clock, the Rev. manner in which the minister intended to M. Jones, of Baba, addressed the congregation pursue his pastoral labours ; to the whole of generally, on the importance of their duties which prompt and most satisfactory answers with regard to the ministry. The above were given. The last question was

ministers delivered sermons also on the swered by detailing what had been done in previous evening, and during the whole of pastoral visitation, as indicative of the la- the day. bourer's intention for the future.

“ The oldest minister in the county," the Rev. Thomas Weaver, then offered the ordi- On Thursday, January 23rd, the Rev. Jobn nation prayer.

The simplicity of its ex- Hallett, late of Rotherham College, was pub. pression, its comprehensive import and eleva- licly ordained as pastor over the Congretion of sentiment, rendered it peculiarly gational Church in this town. The morning appropriate to the solemn occasion. It was service was begun with the reading of suitaccompanied by the laying on of the hands able portions of Scripture, and prayer, by the of most of the assembled presbytery.

Rev. J. Lockwood, B.A., of Tavistock. The But the most impressive part of the service Rev. S. Mc All, of Nottingham, gave the inwas the charge delivered in the evening by troductory discourse, in which he sketched the brother of the newly ordained pastor, the history, and defended the principles of the Rev. Edmund Crisp, late president of the Congregationalism, in a very able and conMission College, Bangalore, and now pastor clusive manner. The Rev. Professor Creak, of the Independent Church, Grantham. We M.A., of Airdale College, proposed the have complied with the request to furnish usual questions, to which Mr. Hallett satisthis brief notice, principally to have it in our factorily responded. Mr. Outram (a deacon) power to say a word or two upon this, as gave, in the name of the church, an account it ever will be to us, memorable discourse. of the steps which had led to Mr. Hallett's We speak not of its masterly character con- settlement among them, and stated that he sidered as a “charge,” of the chasteness and was desired earnestly to renew their invitaelegance of its diction—its nervous and tion, which Mr. Hallett accepted. The Rev. sequeut thought, but of the spirit of holi- J. Gawthorn, of Derby, (in the absence of the ness which pervaded every sentence. It Rev. W. Salt, of Litchfield,) offered the came down with the dews of heaven fresh ordination prayer. The Rev. W. H. upon it, and left in the mind one desire for Stowell, D.D., President of Cheshunt (late holiness. Oh what power there is in holiness! of Rotherbam) College, delivered an earnest, was the impression, or rather conviction with faithful, and an affectionate charge to the which we separated ; some of us wishing young minister, founded on Titus ii. 15– the whole congregational ministry had been Let no man despise thee;" and the morning present to be refreshed and blessed as we service concluded with prayer by the Rev.

E. Crisp, of Grantham. We hope this charge will be heard again A numerous party dined in the schooland again; that it will be printed, and then room adjoining the chapel. After which, read by multitudes. May God's blessing rest speeches were delivered by the Revs. Twidale, upon Longden, and sanctify a day which of Melton Mowbray; Gawthorn, of Derby; many will never forget!

Stephenson (Wesleyan), Muncaster, of Gainsboro' ; Mc All, of Nottingham; and Weaver,

of Mansfield. At five o'clock, a party of On the 27th of December, 1850, the Rev. three hundred sat down to tea. David Jones, from the North Wales Academy, The evening service was introduced by the and formerly of Llanbrynmair, was publicly Rev. J. Mancaster, after which the Rev. set apart to the work of the Christian minis- T. Raffles, D.D., LL.D., of Liverpool, preached try over the Congregational Church at Wevin, / an impressive sermon to the church and conin the county of Carnarvon, North Wales ; gregation, from 2 Thess. j. 1–“ Pray for us, the following ministers officiated on the in- that the word of the Lord may bave free teresting occasion :— The introductory dis- course, and be glorified;" and the services of course on the nature of a Christian church, was the day, which were of a deeply interesting delivered by the Rev. W. Ambrose, of Port nature, were concluded by the Rev. Doctor Madock; the usual questions were proposed pronouncing the benediction. to the young minister, by his late tutor, the The Revs. Medcalf and Short, of Lincoln; Rev. M. Jones, of Baba ; the ordination Gingell (Baptist); Richardson (Primitive prayer was offered by the Rev. T. Griffith, Methodist); Randerson (Wesleyan); Wynn Capel-helyg; the charge to the minister was (Methodist New Connexion); Pope, of Coldelivered by his late pastor, the Rev. s. linghamı ; Leighton, of Heanor ; Ash, of Roberts, M.A., of Llanbrynmair; and the Laxton; and others ministers, were also

were.

ORDINATION.

ܪ

TESTIMONIAL TO DR. J. PYE SMITH.

present, and took part in the solemnities of of that day, the peculiar satisfaction they felt the day.

in being permitted thus to meet one to whom The attendance upon the whole of the they, and the church of Christ at large, were services was highly encouraging, and gave i under such deep obligations, that they could promise of future prosperity to the church, not suffer him to close his long and brilliant and happiness and usefulness to the pastor. career, or to retire from the Academical po

sition which he had sustained for half &

century, without some appropriate and enDEAR SIR, -I know you will welcome to during testimonial. The Address, which was the pages of the EVANGELICAL MAGAZINE a listened to with much pleasure, as expressing brief account of the public breakfast which the feelings of the entire company, concluded was given at the London Tavern, on Wednes- with an assurance that all who were present day, Jan. 6th, for the purpose of presenting a

would follow their honoured and beloved Testimonial to the Rev. John Pye Smith, guest into his retirement with their sympaD.D., LL.D., F.R.S., &c., &c., on his retiring thies, their affections, and their prayers that into private life.

health and peace might still be afforded him; The chair was occupied by W. A. Hankey, and that as his past life had been consecrated Esq., the Treasurer to the Fund.

to the service of his Great Master, so his deThere were present a large number of the clining years might be sweetened by the conprincipal ministers and laymen of the Con- sciousness of His favour, and by the bright gregational body.

hope of his final reward. At the Chairman's left hand the venerable The Chairman then, with much feeling, Doctor was seated, accompanied by various presented the Address to Dr. Smith; the members of his family.

whole company rising to do him honour. After the company had partaken of an The venerable Doctor seemed quite overelegant repast, the Chairman introduced the come with emotion, and was only able to business of the day in a very appropriate articulate a few words of response, which speech.

were almost inaudible. Ebenezer Smith, He stated that they were assembled to give Esq., the Doctor's eldest son, then rose, and a practical answer to an important question, after a few touching and appropriate remarks, “What shall be done to the man whom the read a reply to the address, on behalf of his great Head of the Church hath honoured ?" father, whose voice and delicate state of health

The King of kings had honoured their dis. were such as to render it impossible for him tinguished friend and guest in a signal man- to make himself heard. ner, by endowing him with a mind of extra- The document, which was received with ordinary power, and by communicating to much applause, expressed in simple phrase him, in early life, the blessings of His grace; the gratitude of a warm and loving heart, and as well as by affording him length of days, in made distinct mention of several of the Doc. which to exemplify the talents committed to tor's earliest and constant friends, some of his trust. He had been favoured with an whom were present, but many of whom had extended period of existence, in which he had fallen asleep in Jesus. done well, and had served his heavenly W. Fox, Esq., solicitor, then read a draft Father, the Church on earth, and the genera- of the deed of trust, which contained the tion in which he lived, in a conspicuous names of fifteen trustees, who were to present

the interest of the money which had been Mr. Hankey also said, that he himself had raised, to Dr. Smith during his life, and then been privileged with something more than a to found Divinity Scholarships, to bear his common place acquaintance with the Doctor name, at New College. and his labours, during the last fifty years. The Rev. Dr. Leifchild considered that the

The only regret he felt on that occasion honour and privilege of being permitted to was the comparative smallness of the sum say a few words, on that auspicious day, could which had been raised; but he trusted it only be conferred on him by reason of his would be sufficient to comfort the declining age. years of their honoured guest; and then He was delighted to echo the sentiments of would serve to found Divinity Scholarships, reverence and esteem which had been so to perpetuate his illustrious name, in con. forcibly expressed for his much-loved friend, nexion with New College.

Dr. Pye Smith, who possessed a rare and The Rev. J. C. Harrison, one of the hono- | happy combination of classical, theological, rary secretaries, announced letters received and scientific knowledge ; all departments of from several noblemen, ministers, and gentle- / which had been enriched by his pen. men, expressive of their regret at not being The Rev. Dr. Harris, President of New able to be present, and read an elaborate and College, was sure that all present must feel beautiful address to Dr. Smith, showing the that, in thus meeting to pay their tribute of circumstances which led to the proceedings respect to their venerable and venerated friend

manner.

and father, Dr. J. Pye Smith, they were doing ness to Dr. Smith's services to the literature themselves quite as much honour as they of our denomination. were doing him.

Samuel Morley, Esq., could never forget He considered that, in this day of homage the kind attention and important lessons he to mere wealth and title, it was something to had received in his early days, as well as in be able to feel that the object of their respect later years, from their distinguished friend was one whose character was wealth, and and guest. whose name had long been an honoured title. The Rev. G. Clayton referred most touch

Thomas Piper, Esq., referred, in very touch- | ingly to the members of the Doctor's family, ing terms, to his long and intimate connexion and could not but be thankful that such & with his valued and honoured friend, and father was to be represented by such children, expressed the heart-felt gratification he had when he should be no more. found in the engagements of the morning. J. W. Smith, Esq., of Sheffield, another son

The Rev. T. Binney had great pleasure in of the venerable Doctor, acknowledged, in being present, although it was at much per- very appropriate terms, the reference which sonal inconvenience. He should have been had been made to the family to which he had extremely sorry, if he could not have been the privilege to belong. there to pay respect to such distinguished Thus terminated the interesting proceedworth as was combined in their friend, whom ings of the day, around which, however, there they rejoiced to honour.

was thrown considerable gloom, as it was E. Miall, Esq., was happy to unite in pay- apparent to all, that, within the last few ing that tribute of esteem and affection to months, one who had long been so full of their honoured guest, the more especially as health and vigour, was becoming so feeble his own feelings and sentiments had gathered and infirm. Still, the heart's desire and strength from Dr. Smith's example.

prayer to God of all present was, that he The Rev. Dr. Campbell was able to speak whom they had assembled that day to honour, to the generous and heart-felt affection with might be spared for many years to come ; which Dr. Smith was regarded beyond the a desire and prayer in which, I am quite sure, Tweed. His was the first great English dear sir, you join most cordially. name with which he himself became ac

Yours truly, quainted. Twenty-three years ago, he felt it

I. V. M. to be an honour and a privilege to make the Hackney. acquaintance and friendship of the author of the “ Messiah,"—that great work which will go down to a distant posterity, and class him THE SONS OF MINISTERS AND MISSIONwith our Owens, Baxters, and other illustrious divines.

DEAR SIR,-I shall be happy, through The Rev. J. N. Goulty, a pupil of the your kindness, to lay before the readers of Moctor's about forty years ago, bore an affec- the EVANGELICAL MAGAZINE, some account

onate testimony to his personal worth, and of this Institution, whose existence is probathe high estimation in which he was held by bly unknown to many of them, and known all his students.

to others only by name. I think we may H. Rutt, Esq., felt no ordinary gratification warrantably affirm that we have not been in being permitted to express his entire con- guilty of obtruding our affairs and claims currence in all that had been said respecting either frequently or offensively before the Dr. Smith's private and public worth.

Christian public; but, as a Committee, have Professor William Smith, LL.D., of New laboured in a quiet, unostentatious manner to College, bore testimony to Dr. Pye Smith's maintain the interests of the school, and to exalted personal piety, superior mental attain- diffuse its benefits. ments, and earnest studiousness, even at his It is now almost twenty years since its present advanced age; of which he adduced formation. During that period it has resome striking illustrations.

ceived, to the enjoyment of its educational The Rev. J. Davies, successor, and formerly advantages, the sons of our Christian pastors co-pastor with Dr. Pye Smith, testified to the in all parts of the kingdom, and of our decordiality which had always subsisted be- voted missionaries in various quarters of the tween them.

globe. Its object, as originally announced, The Rev. J. C. Harrison expressed his was “to provide a religious, classical, and sense of the lasti obligation under which he commercial education, on economical terms." had been laid to Dr. Smith, by the valuable Its managers confidently appeal to the hisinstruction lic received while at Homerton tory of the past, and to the results which College, as well as by the numerous instances have been achieved, as satisfactory proof that of kindness shown him since that period. its benevolent design has thus far been pur

The Rev. S. Thodey was able to bear wit- sued and accomplished ; and they have the

NORTHERN CONGREGATIONAL SCHOOL FOR

ARIES.

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