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FORTIETH DAY

When Uncle Jack walked into the sitting room, he found May playing with her dolls. As she was talking to herself out loud, Uncle Jack heard something like this:

“I don't know what's the matter with my dolls. Not one of them will take her afternoon nap. I wonder if they don't like the new doll I got in Montreal, — the papoose! Now do be quiet, Dinah. What! You won't? The first thing you know, you'll get a whipping that will do you good. Hm! So you don't want to associate with an Indian baby. Why not, I'd like to know? Because she has a red skin, I suppose. Don't you know that beauty is only skin deep? That's not the reason? Well, what is, then, I should like to know? Oh-h-h-h! Because she's from Canada and you are from South Carolina! I never heard of such a thing! Where are your manners? Don't you know that we should be particularly kind to strangers? That's what Mother says. You are

.

acting like a little savage. Now between you and me, if you won't be quiet, I shall whip you!”

“But, May, child, why don't you take your own advice?” said Uncle Jack, interrupting the soliloquy. “Try kindness, and see what that will do. You know, if she is a little savage, that Music hath charms to soothe the savage breast.””

So he sat down at the piano with May by his side, holding Dinah in her arms, and they sang:

SLUMBER SONG
Arr. by GEORGE H. GARTLAN

BRAHMS

1. Lul - la - by and good-night, To cheeks ro - sy bright, 2. Lul - la - by and good-night, Till glad morning light, .

1. Lul - la - by and good 2. Lul - la - by and good

night
night,

To cheeks ro - sy, ro- sy bright,
Till glad morn-ing, morning light

To fin - gers
While fair - est

safe hid
of forms

'Neathcov - er - let
In dreams fill the

;

To While

fin fair

- gers

- est

safe
of

hid ..
forms.

'Neath
In

cov - er . let!
dreams fill the

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“Thank you, Uncle Jack,” said May, as they finished the song. “Dinah is fast asleep, now.”

TO THE PUPIL:

1. Soliloquy means the act of talking to one's self. . 2. Arrange the following as four lines of poetry, observing proper capitalization, spelling, and punctuation. Indent the second and fourth lines.

if your lips youd keep from slips five things observe with care of whom you speak to whom you speak and how and when and where.

TO THE TEACHER:

Have the pupils exchange papers, and correct them from your work on the Bb.

Review, 419–424.

FORTY-FIRST DAY

When the children came in from school they all looked somewhat glum.

“What's the matter, Ben?” asked Uncle Jack.

“I didn't do very well in my history to-day, Uncle Jack,” replied Ben. “And besides, Pudgy fouled me when we were practicing our relay racing, and I fell and hurt myself.”

“That's too bad, Ben. Better luck next time,” said Uncle Jack. “And what about you, Belle?”

“It's that old geography, again, Uncle Jack. Sylvia and I both missed to-day. So we had to stay in to make it up, and she got out before I did,” was her response.

“And you, May?”.

“Oh, Uncle Jack, it was the multiplication table again. I don't care whether twelve times nine are one hundred and twelve or one hundred and sixteen. I don't see what difference it makes, anyway. Can't I always count on my fingers?” “Well, let us see,” said Uncle Jack: “Suppose

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