Page images
PDF
EPUB

on

and M. Hue. The views on the alignments were varied ; into the depths of the forest. Even when feeding it is they were ex-votos, and they were connected with the restless, and it seldom reposes long in the same lair. In Trojan war; but the majority hesitated to express an the Ituri forest these animals avoid swampy ground, and opinion. M. le Rouzic, Dr. Baudouin and others, subject always drink from clear running streams. During rain to more extensive researches in Brittany and elsewhere, they seek shelter in the densest thickets or even under an were disposed to connect them with a solar cult. Among abandoned roof, and it is at such times that they are other papers, Dr. Atgier discussed the Megalithic enclosures, most usually seen by the natives. and M. de Clérambant galgals, or cairns, in Indre-et-Loire. In the Ituri forest the okapi does not eat the giant

M. de Villemereuil proposed a motion on the State pro- leaves of Sarcophrynium amoldianum, which Major tection of megaliths. Speaking generally, it may be said Powell-Cotton believes to be the plant alluded to by that both the discussions and the numerous papers were of Captain Boyd-Alexander in his account of the animal ini much interest, and the meetings were attended by more the Welle district. Specimens of four difierent kinds ut than a hundred members.

leaves which form the food of the Ituri forest okapi are The following three days were taken up with excellently being brought home for identification. organised excursions ; weather, vehicles, meals, and speeches, all were of the best, and more than a hundred took part in each excursion. The first day was consecrated

UNIVERSITY AND EDUCATIONAL to the Gulf of Morbihan, and among the objects visited

INTELLIGENCE. were the cromlechs of Kergonan, the tumulus of Gavr'inis, and the magnificent dolmens of Locmariaquer, including The honorary degree of LL.D. has been conferred upun the largest known menhir. On the second day visits were Sir Thomas Barlow and Prof. C. S. Sherrington, F.R.S., paid to the little-known alignments of St. Pierre, in by Harvard University. Quiberon, and of Erdeven, and to the dolmens of Roch-en

Ar a Convocation of the University of Durham, held on Aud, Crocuno, Rondossec, &c.

September 29, the honorary degree of D.Sc. was conferred The third day was reserved for Carnac and its marvellous

upon Sir William White, K.C.B., and Prof. Lebour. alignments Menec, Kermario, and Kerlescant.

Worthy of special mention were the visits to the tumulus Prof. Wien, who occupies the chair of physics at Würzof Moustoir-Carnac, and to the Miln Museum, where the burg, informs us that he has declined the invitation m secretary of the congress paid a well-deserved tribute to

succeed the late Prof. Drude as professor of physics in the the brilliant efforts of the regretted founder and his University of Berlin, because the Prussian Government is enthusiastic and devoted pupil, M. le Rouzic. Finally, a

unable to undertake the erection of a modern physical visit was rendered to the splendid tumulus of St. Michel- | laboratory there. Carnac, so well cared for by M. d'Ault du Mesnil, president Prof. E. A. Minchin, F.R.S., the recently appointed of the Megalithic Monuments Commission, who himself professor of protozoology in the University of London, will acted as guide.

deliver his inaugural lecture on “ The Scope and Problems In the course of the three days numerous speeches were of Protozoology

November 15. The L'niversity made by foreign members, who were roused to enthusiasm

library, in which is included the Goldsmiths' Companys alike by the monuments and by the organisation of the library of economic literature, will be opened by the Chan. gathering. Mention must be made of the utterances of

cellor on the afternoon of Friday, October 26. M. Rutot, on the Gulf of Morbihan ; of Dr. Baudouin, on submerged megaliths in Brittany and Vendée, and on the

Tue new calendar of University College, London, contechnique of restorations; and of the erudition of M. tains an interesting outline of the history of the college de Mortillet, as well as of the demonstrations of MM.

by Dr. G. Carey Foster, F.R.S. The contribution deals d'Ault du Mesnil and le Rouzic; the latter also spoke in

with the growth and development of the University it the Miln Museum on the alignments of Carnac, and on

London as a teaching university, and the part played by his researches on the spot.

University College in that development. Particulars ar As the scene of the next congress in 1907 Abbeville was

given of the post-graduate courses offered this session in suggested by more than one speaker. Before the congress

all faculties, and of the original work produced in the separated, the healths of M. de Mortillet, Dr. Baudouin, college during last session. The number of research and and M. Giraux were proposed in eulogistic terms. As post-graduate students last year was 134, as against 119 M. Rutot said, a society that has been able to accomplish

in the previous session. so much in its infancy will do much more in its maturer The first volume of the report for 1904 of the Connyears, and this was equally the opinion of the foreign missioner of the United States Bureau of Education has savants who attended the meeting.

at last been issued. A gratifying feature noted in the ro ports of the agricultural and mechanical colleges is the

largely increased aid granted them by the several States A NEW SPECUIEN OF TIIE OKAPI. and Territories. This aid amounted for the year to about a letter from the Congo Free State, published in the

1,131,000l., an increase of more than 200,000l. over the IN Times of September 26, Major P. H. G. Powell-Cotton

amount for the preceding year. A chapter of more than states that he has succeeded in obtaining the skeleton and

a hundred pages is devoted to the regulations relating to skin of a fine male okapi. This animal was killed at

pensions and insurance in all German universities. The Makala, in the Ituri forest, by the native hunter Agukki,

data were coiiected by Prof. Julius Hatscheck, of Heide who shot the two specimens taken to Europe by Dr.

berg, for Dr. Theodore Marburg, trustee of Johns Hopkins David. After careful inquiry, Major Powell-Cotton is un

University, and by the latter presented to the U.S. Com

missioner of Education. able to satisfy himself that any European has hitherto

It appears that in German killed an okapi. A Swiss official named Jeannet, in the

membership in any teaching body means, nolens wlens, employ of the Congo Government, was, however, in 1905

the payment of regular contributions to the pension funt shown one of these animals by a native as it stood in

of that body, except in elementary schools, where the thick covert, where it was shot by the latter. This the

State assumes the entire burden of pension payment. h. writer believes to be the first living okapi (or “ kangi," John W. Hoyt contributes a detailed account of the Unias it is called by the Makala natives) seen by a European.

versity of Paris during the Middle Ages. Among other According to information furnished by the Mambutti chapters of interest in the report, which runs to 1176 pages, (pigmies), the okapi is generally a solitary animal, the

may be mentioned two on education at the St. Louis two members of a pair invariably feeding apart, although, Exposition and one on higher education in England as together with their single calf, they may frequent the same

affected by the Act of 1902, in which prominence is given section of the forest. The call, which is born in May, is

to Prof. Sadler's reports to various county councils. left hidden in covert by the female, who returns to it at At the University of Leeds on Monday, the inaugural intervals for feeding purposes. Hearing and smell are very address of the new session was delivered by Sir James acute in the okapi, so that the sound of an axe or the Crichton-Browne upon the subject of " Universities and faintest scent of man drives it from its feeding grounds | Medical Education." In the course of his remarks, de

Or

said that centuries ago gifts were given for the promotion effective, and provides for the nourishment of the actively of objects equivalent to those which modern universities lengthening axis cylinders. At the peripheral end, unless hold in view, which, considering the pecuniary resources

the axons reach it, it is ineffective in so far as any real of those who gave them, should put our most open-handed new formation of nerve-fibres is concerned. If, however, modern millionaires to shame. England has been remiss the axons reach the peripheral segment, the work of the of late in perceiving and promoting those interests that neurilemmal cells has not been useless, for they provide hinge on scientific and medical research. In this direction the supporting and nutritive elements necessary for their Germany has stolen a march upon us, for the various continued and successful growth. The neurilemmal activity Governments in that Empire have unstintedly provided their appears to be essential, for without it, as in the central universities with fully-equipped research laboratories, nervous system, regeneration does not take place. organised and conducted by professorial directors. A uni- According to Graham Kerr, the formation of neuroversity is something more than a medical school, a work- fibrillæ may possibly take place in the protoplasmic residue shop of research, or a home of science. It must have of the degenerated axis cylinder ; according to Marinesco, loftier aims than material advancement commercial this property is assigned to the neurilemmal elements themprosperity. It must provide for culture in its widest sense, selves, a proposition which is extremely improbable, seeing afford intellectual guidance, encourage individuality, take that these elements are mesoblastic. In either case these cognisance of the theoretical problems that arise in the two observers consider that the neuro-fibrillæ, however progress of civilisation, be a storehouse of knowledge, and formed, are ineffective until they are activated by union a gymnasium for the exercise of all the powers of the

with those of the central axons. The present observations mind; and to be truly a university it must be an organism, do not entirely exclude this view, but, on the other hand, and not a mere conglomeration of parts. The one great they lend it no support. The facts are readily explicable, objection to the multiplication of universities is that they however, on the theory that the nerve-fibres are growths may tend to become local seminaries, somewhat parochial from the central ends of divided nerves. in spirit, and fed exclusively from one district, for'it would be a misfortune to a boy to pass from a secondary school “ The Ionisation produced by Hot Platinum in Different to a university in the next street, where he would meet as

Gases."

By Prof. O. W. Richardson. Communicated his fellow-students only his old schoolfellows, and where, by Prof. J. J. Thomson, F.R.S. however amply fed with knowledge, he would still be The present paper forms an account of an experimental surrounded by the same traditions and associations and investigation of the steady positive ionisation produced by shop amongst which he had been brought up. A provincial hot bodies, platinum being assumed to be typical. university is a contradiction in terms. What is wanted is The following are the chief results :a group of territorial universities, each with distinctive The positive ionisation, i.e. the number of positive ions features of its own, specially adapting it to its environ- produced by ! sq. cm. of platinum surface per second, ment, but all affording the most liberal instruction, the possesses a minimum value, which depends on temperature finest culture, the best intellectual discipline of the day, and pressure, in most gases. The positive ionisation in and collectively meeting the higher educational needs of oxygen at a low pressure (less than 1 mm.) is much greater the whole country.

than in the other gases tried. In oxygen at low pressures,

and temperatures below 1000° C., the ionisation varies as SOCIETIES AND ACADEMIES.

the square root of the pressure ; at higher temperatures and

low pressures it varies nearly directly as the pressure ; LONDON.

whilst at higher pressures at all temperatures the variation Royal Society, June 20. Regeneration of Nerves." By with pressure is slower, so that at pressures approaching Dr. F. W. Mott, F.R.S., Prof. W. D. Halliburton, atmospheric the ionisation becomes practically independent F.R.S., and Arthur Edmunds.

of the pressure. Five sets of experiments are recorded as a contribution The variation with pressure in air is similar to that in to the discussion as to whether the regeneration of nerve- oxygen. In nitrogen and hydrogen the ionisation appeared fibres is autogenetic or not. The experimental methods to increase more rapidly with the pressure at high pressures approach the subject in different ways, and in no case was than in oxygen. In very pure helium at low pressures any evidence forthcoming of auto-regeneration.

there was a positive ionisation which was a function of The facts recorded, taken in conjunction with those pub- the pressure. lished by such observers as Cajal and Langley and Ander- The experiments on ionisation by collisions indicate that son, form, on the other hand, strong pieces of evidence in the positive ions liberated by hot platinum in oxygen are favour of the Wallerian doctrine that new nerve-fibres are of the same order of magnitude as those set free by the growths from the central ends of divided nerve trunks. collisions. The experimental facts recorded by those who, like Bethe The positive leak in oxygen always oscillated around a and Kennedy, hold the opposite view, are susceptible of certain value under specified conditions. It was, therefore, easy explanation, mainly on the lines emphasised by never steady, so the minimum values were taken. This Langley and Anderson, of accidental and unnoticed con- variability was much less marked in the other gases. nection of the peripheral segments with the central nervous The minimum value of the positive ionisation was found system by means of other nerves cut through in the oper- to remain practically constant with a wire heated during ation. If such connection is effectually prevented, real three months at various times (for 150 hours altogether) regeneration of structure and restoration of function never in oxygen at 900°-1000° C. Moreover, four different wires

of different dimensions after continued heating in oxygen Moreover, the regenerated fibres always degenerate in a gave nearly the same value for the ionisation at the same peripheral direction, and in a peripheral direction only, temperatures and pressures. when the link that binds them to the central nervous The positive ionisation in air at constant temperature system is again severed. Perhaps the most striking of the is smaller than that which would be obtained if the nitrogen facts brought out in the present paper is in reference to were withdrawn, so as to leave only oxygen at a low the development of the medullary sheath; this appendage pressure. The nitrogen, therefore, exerts an inhibiting of the axis cylinder appears earliest at situations near the effect on the oxygen. point where the ends of a nerve have been joined together, The minimum value of the positive ionisation at and reaches the distal portions later.

definite pressure in all gases appears to be connected with What takes place in the peripheral segment of a divided the temperature by the relation first deduced by the author nerve is a multiplication, elongation, and union into long for the negative ionisation. This relation may be written chains of the neurilemmal cells. The same change is even i=A0e-/20, where i is the ionisation, is the absolute more vigorous at the central termination of the cut nerve ; temperature, and A and Q are constants. The value of and the view of the phagocytic and nutritive function the constant Q, which is a measure of the energy associated attributed to this sheath has been supported independently with the liberation of an ion, is in most cases smaller for by some striking observations of Graham Kerr which are the positive than for the negative ionisation. referred to. At the central end this nutritive function is

These results refer to wires which have been heated in

occur.

a or

ܪܪ

560

560

a vacuum, and subsequently in the gas considered, for a authors' intention to follow out this research on the same long time. New wires exhibit peculiar properties, especially lines as those adopted in the work on Eucalypts and their in regard to their behaviour under different electromotive essential oils. Bulk material was employed in obrainforces. Old wires also exhibit hysteretic effects with ing the results given in the paper. The Melaleucas are change of pressure.

commonly known as “tea trees, and are distributed The view is developed that the positive ionisation is throughout the whole continent of Australia, and are caused by the gas adsorbed by the metal and the con- familiar plants in the bush. Two species form the subject sequence examined of supposing the ionisation to be pro- of this paper, viz. M. thymifolia, Sm., and M. Tina rifolia portional to the amount of the adsorbed gas present. In Sm.- litis opaca F.v.M., and its enlarged rootstok the case of oxygen, by making the assumption that the R. T. Baker and H. G. Smith. The occurrence of this rate of increase of the amount of the adsorbed gas is pro- enlarged rootstocks, weighing from 20 lb. to 25 lb., in the portional jointly to the concentration of the external dis- Australian species of Vitis, has been recorded by Baron sociated oxygen and to the area of " unoccupied " platinum Mueller, Thozet, Roth, and others, but no chemical insurface, whilst the rate of breaking up is proportional to | vestigation of their composition appears to have been made. the amount present, a formula is obtained which agrees | Such an investigation forms the basis of this paper. Frora with the experimental results. This formula is that the the results a close affinity between the carbohydrates af jonisation i=Ap/(B+p), where p=(kP+ 4ko): - ik, P this “ tuber " and those belonging to the true gums is being the external pressure and k the dissociation constant shown, and the alteration products are more in the direcof oxygen ; A, B, and k are constants depending on the tion of the sugars than the starches.-Investigation of the temperature, and are of the general form aole-b/0. Thus

disease in cattle known as rickets, wobbles," and this view accounts for both the temperature and pressure examination of the poisonous principle of the Zamia palm variation.

(Macrozamia Fraseri): E. A. Mann and T. L Wallas. The positive ionisation from the outer surface of a hot

The authors for some time have been carrying on investi. platinum tube in air is increased when hydrogen is allowed

gations on the above subject, as the result of which they to diffuse through from inside the apparatus. The in- have come to the conclusion that the effects upon cattle crease in the ionisation is proportional at constant tempera- induced by eating the Macrozamia Fraseri are causeri bov ture to the quantity of hydrogen escaping from the surface

the presence in the plant of acid potassium oxalate Salis in unit time.

of sorrel). This is a confirmation of the results of an The negative ionisation from hot platinum in air is un

analysis made by a Mr. Norrie prior to 1876, and preported altered when hydrogen is allowed to disluse out through to the Royal Society of New South Wales by Dr. F. Mil. the platinum.

ford (Journal of the Society, vol. x., p. 295). These results show that neither the negative nor the positive ionisations usually observed with hot platinum heated in air or oxygen are due to residual traces of

CONTENTS.

PAGE absorbed hydrogen.

A wire which has been heated in hydrogen furnishes a The Evolution of the Globe. By A. H negative ionisation which is very big compared with that The Genesis of the Inventor. By W. H. S.

359 from a wire heated in oxygen at the same temperature. If Biological Philosophy . the hydrogen is at a pressure of the order of 1 mm. the Biology of the Frog. By F. W. G. negative ionisation can be rapidly reduced to a much

Our Book Shelf:smaller value by applying a high negative potential to the wire. The wire subsequently recovers its ionising power Oltmanns : “ Morphologie und Biologie der Algen." if the potential is reduced again. Under these conditions - George Murray, F.R.S. . . the ionisation varies in an interesting way with the time. Beauverie and Faucheron : “ * Atlas colorié de la Flore The reduction in the ionising power of the wire appears to be caused by the bombardment of the surface by positive Letters to the Editor :

alpine”

361 ions produced by collisions.

When a platinum wire, which has previously been Measurement of Resemblance. (Illustrated'.)-Dr. allowed to absorb hydrogen, is heated for a long time in

Francis Galton, F.R.S. . . a good vacuum so as to expel the gas, its ionising power Models of Atoms.-Prof. Alfred W. Porter

563 does not appear to be reduced. The ionisation apparently

Chemical and Electrical Changes induced by Light. — is not a definite function of the quantity of gas absorbed by the wire.

H. S. Allen . .
Paris.

The Rusting of Iron.-Dr. Gerald T. Moody. 364 Academv of Sciences, September 24.–M. A. Chauveau Remarkable Rainbow Phenomena. - Prof. J. M. in the chair.-The colour and spectra of solar promin

Pernter ....

564 ences : M. Ricco. Direct observation of the eastern group of protuberances during the total eclipse of 1905 showed

Fugitive Coloration of Sodalite.-Jas. Currie

564 that the colour different in different parts, and

The Quatercentenary Celebrations of the Univer. especially at the edges, the latter showing a play of colours. sity of Aberdeen. (Illustratel.)

565 The body of the protuberance was purple-red, the outside Two Books on Angling. (Illustrated.) By J. J. was violet-blue, the summit was pure violet, nearly white, Prof. Ludwig Boltzmann. By Prof. G. H. Bryan, and exceedingly brilliant. Two photographs of the sper

F.R.S. .

569 were taken, enlarged reproductions of which are

Notes given.—The application of M. E. Borel's method of sum

570 mation to generalised trigonometrical series : A. Buhl.

Our Astronomical Column:The amplification of sounds : M. Dussaud. The vibra- Comet 19062 (Kopf)

573 tions from any source of sound are received on a mem

Finlay's Comet, 1906d

575 brane, and this, either directly, or through a solid, acts

A New Form of Wedge Photometer .

575 on a jet of compressed air. The sound is in this way faithfully reproduced by the jet of air, the amount of

Occultation of a Star by Venus .

575 amplification depending only on the power of the motor

Results of the International Latitude Service, 1902used in the compression.—The recent scientific cruise of the 1906.

573 Otaria : Teisserenc de Bort.

The Amana Meteorite

573 NEW SOUTH WALES.

Botany at the British Association Linnean Society, August 1.-Prof. T. P. Anderson Stuart,

The Archæological Congress at Vannes

577 president, in the chair.-The Australian Melaleucas and

A New Specimen of the Okapi their essential oils, part i.: R. T. Baker and H. G, Smith. In this series of papers on the Melaleucas and

University and Educational Intelligeace their essential oils, of which this is the first, it is the Societies and Academies .

579

561

563

564

was

368

trum

378 578

.

MR. EDWARD ARNOLD'S NEW BOOKS.

The De La More Press.
HYPNOTISM: Its History, Practice, and

Theory. By J. MILNE BRAMWELL, M.B., C.M. Demy 8vo, ALTERNATING CURRENTS, Cloth. 1&s net The chief aim of this monograph is to draw the attention of medical men A Text-book for Students of Engineering. to the therapeutic value of bypnotism. The author bas devoted the last (welve years to hypnotic practice and research, and his personal observation

By C. G. LAMB, M.A., B.Sc., of the practical work done in France, Germany, Sweden, Holland, Switzer. Clare College, Cambridge. Associate Member of the Institution of Elecland, and Belgium, should also make the volume a valuable addition to the

trical Engineers; Associate of the City and Guilds of London Institute. science of a subject which is exciting much interest at the present time.

Demy 8vo. With Illustrations. 10s. 6d. net.
LOGIC, DEDUCTIVE AND INDUCTIVE.

By CARYETH READ, M.A., Professor of Logic at University A MANUAL OF HYDRAULICS.
College. Third Edition, revised and enlarged. Crown 8vo. 6s.
A LONG-STANDING WANT-FIRST STEPS TO GERMAN

By R. BUSQUET,
FOR SCIENCE STUDENTS.

Professor à l'École Industrielle de Lyon.
A FIRST GERMAN COURSE FOR SCIENCE

Translated by A. H. PEAKE, M.A., STUDENTS. By Professor H. G. FIEDLER and F. E. Demonstrator in Mechanism and Applied Mechanics in the University of SANDBACH. With diagrams. Square 8vo. 28. 6d, net.

Cambridge. Crown 8vo. With Illustrations, 7s. 6d. net. This book is intended for science students who desire to read, with the expenditure of the minimum amount of time, scientific text-books in German. For this purpose it will be found a valuable aid to a practical

APPLIED ELECTRICITY. working knowledge of the German language. The grammatical portion is simple in arrangement and brief, wbile the reading examples will be found

A Text-book of Electrical Engineering for Second-Year Students. of great assistance, and the diagrams illustrating scientific instruments and

By J. PALEY YORKE, experiments help to fix the names in the memory.

Head of the Physics and Electrical Engineering Department, Poplar A SECOND GERMAN COURSE by the

School of Marine Engineering. xii+420 pages. Crown 8vo. 7s. 60. Authors. 25. 6d, net.

(In the press. THE STUDY OF PLANT LIFE FOR YOUNG

PEOPLE. By M. C. STOPES, D.Sc. London. Designed cover.
Illustrated with plates and numerous diagrams. Royal 8vo, cloth.

AND THE PROPERTIES OF RADIUM. 23. 64. net

By the Hon. R. J. STRUTT, THE LITTLE BLACK PRINCESS: A True Tale

Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. New Edition, Revised and Enof Life in the Never-Never Land. By Mrs. ÆNEAS

larged. Demy 8vo. With Diagrams. 8s. 6d. net. ("Jeannie") GUNN. An entertaining experience of native life on a station in the Australian Busb. With many illustrations from photo- THE EVOLUTION THEORY. graphs. Square 8vo, cloth, special cover design. Third Edition

58. net. "The author has a great sense of humour, and seizes on salient features

By AUGUST WEISMANN, of native life and describes them in a few words; these gifts, combined with

Professor of Zoology in the University of Freiburg. a real sympathy with the blackfellow, have enabled her to write a little

Translated by book that is full of human interest." - Vaturi,

Professor J. ARTHUR THOMSON and MARGARET THOMSON, A complete Catalogue will be sent on application.

Two volumes, Royal 8vo. With many Illustrations. 32s, net. ALEXANDER MORINC, Ltd., 32 Ceorge Street, Hanover Square, W. London : EDWARD ARNOLD, 41 & 43 Maddox St., W.

same

THE BECQUEREL RAYS

DIRECT READING

CYMOMETERS.

DESIGNED BY

Dr. J. A. FLEMING, F.R.S.,

FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF ELECTRIC WAVES, CAPACITIES, INDUCTANCES, &c.

[graphic][subsumed][ocr errors][ocr errors]

For full Particulars, Instructions and Prices of New Patterns, apply for List 15.

MARCONI'S WIRELESS TELEGRAPH COMPANY, L

LTD

MACMILLAN & CO.'S BOOKS

FOR

STUDENTS OF CENERAL BIOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY.

IOS. net.

25. 6.

IS.

15.

By

IOS. net.

WORKS BY ALFRED RUSSEL WALLACE, EVOLUTION AND MAN'S PLACE F.R.S., LL.D.

IN NATURE. By Prof. H. CALDERWOOD, LLD DARWINISM: An Exposition of the

Second Edition. 8vo. Theory of Natural Selection. Crown 8vo. 75. 6d.

EXPERIMENTAL MORPHOLOGY. NATURAL SELECTION, and By C. B. DAVENPORT, Ph. D. Parts I. and II. 8v. TROPICAL NATURE: and other Essays on Descriptive

9s. net each. and Theoretical Biology. Crown 8vo. 75. 6d.

THE SURVIVAL of the UNLIKE. ISLAND LIFE. Crown 8vo. 75. 6d. By L. H. BAILEY. Crown 8vo. 85. 60. STUDIES SCIENTIFIC and SOCIAL. PHYSIOLOGY for BEGINNERS. By 2 Vois. Extra Crown 8vo. 18s.

Sir M. FOSTER, K.C.B., M.D., and LEWIS E. SHORE, INTRODUCTORY PRIMER

M.A., M.D. Globe 8vo.

OF SCIENCE. By Prof. T. H. HUXLEY, F.R.S. Pott

LESSONS IN ELEMENTARY PHY8vo.

(Science Primers.

SIOLOGY. By THOS. H. HUXLEY, F.R.S. IllusLESSONS IN ELEMENTARY

trated. 45. 6d.

Questions, is. 6d. BIOLOGY. By Prof. T. JEFFERY PARKER, B.Sc., PHYSIOLOGY. By Sir Michael FOSTER, F.R.S. Illustrated. Third Edition, revised. Crown 8vo.

K.C.B., M.D. With Illustrations. Pott 8vo. Ios. 6d.

(Science Primers. A COURSE OF ELEMENTARY TEXT-BOOK of PHYSIOLOGY.

INSTRUCTION IN PRACTICAL BIOLOGY. By Sir MICHAEL FOSTER, K.C.B., M.D. With 11Prof. T. H. HUXLEY, F.R.S., assisted by H. N. lustrations. Part I. Book I. Blood : The Tissues of MoveMARTIN, F.R.S. Third Edition, revised by the late G. B.

ment, the Vascular Mechanism. Sixth Edition. Tos, 6. Howes and D. H. SCOTT, D.Sc. Crown 8vo.

Ios. 60

Part II. Book II. The Tissues of Chemical Action, with ATLAS OF PRACTICAL ELEMEN

their Respective Mechanisms : Nutrition. Fifth Edition, TARY ZOOTOMY. (Being a Revised Edition of the largely revised. 10s. 6d. Part III. Book III. The Central Zoological Portion of the Atlas of Fractical Elementary

Nervous System. Seventh Edition, largely revised. 10s. 61. Biology.) By the late G. B. HOWES, LL.D., F.R.S.,

Part IV. Remainder of Book III. The Senses, and me Professor of Zoology, Royal College of Science, London.

Special Muscular Mechanisms. Sixth Edition, revised With a Preface to the First Edition by T. H. HUXLEY.

Ios. 6d.

Part V. Book IV. The Tissues and Mechan4to.

isms of Reproduction. New edition in preparation. The LIVING ORGANISM. An Intro

Appendix. By A. S. LEA. 75. 6d. duction to the Problems of Biology. By ALFRED EARL,

HANDBOOK OF PHYSIOLOGY. M.A. Crown 8vo. 6s.

For Students and Practitioners of Medicine. By ALSTIS MICRO-ORGANISMS AND FER- FLINT, M.D., LL.D. Fully Illustrated. 8vo. 215.

MENTATION. By A. JÖRGENSEN. Translated by
A.K. MILLER and E. A. LENNHOLM. 8vo.

A
ORGANIC EVOLUTION AS THE PRACTICAL PHYSIOLOGY AND HISTOLOGY,
RESULT OF THE INHERITANCE OF ACQUIRED

By Sir M. FOSTER, K.C. B., and J. N. LANGLEY, CHARACTERS ACCORDING TO THE LAWS OF

D.Sc. Seventh Edition, edited by J. N. LANGLEY, D.Sc., ORGANIC GROWTH. By Dr. G. H. T. EIMER.

F.R.S., and L. E. SHORE, M.D. Crown 8vo. 75. 61 Translated by J. T. CUNNINGHAM, M.A. 8vo.

125. 6d.

PRACTICAL HISTOLOGY. By J. X. ON BRITISH WILD FLOWERS

LANGLEY, M.A. Crown 8vo. 6s. CONSIDERED IN RELATION TO INSECTS. By ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY Lord AVEBURY, F.R.S. Illustrated. Crown 8vo.

[Nature Series.

FOR NURSES. By D. C. KIMBER. 8vo. 10s. Det. The DEVELOPMENT of the FROG'S GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY. By ProEGG. By T. II. MORGAN, Ph.D. Svo. 75. net.

fessor MAX VERWORN, M.D., Ph.D. Translated by REGENERATION. By T. H. MOR- FREDERIC S. LEE, Ph.D. With 285 Illustrations GAN, Ph.D. Illustrated. 8vo. 125. 6d. net.

Medium 8vo. 155. net. EVOLUTION AND ADAPTATION. | STUDIES IN PHYSIOLOGY, By T. II. MORGAN, Ph.D. 8vo. 125. 64, net.

ANATOMY, AND HYGIENE. By J. E. Peabody, A. M AN OUTLINE OF THE THEORY Crown Svo, 55. net.

OF ORGANIC EVOLUTION. By M. M. METCALF, A TEXT-BOOK of the PHYSIO. Ph.D. Svo. Ios. 64. net.

LOGICAL CHEMISTRY OF THE ANIMAL BOD), THE CELL IN DEVELOPMENT including an Account of the Chemical Changes occurring AND INHERITANCE. By E. B. WILSON, Ph.D.

in Disease. By ARTHUR GAMGEE, M.D., F.RS 8vo. 145. net

Vol. II., 18s. THE DYNAMICS OF LIVING ELECTRO-PHYSIOLOGY. By Prof. MATTER. By Prof. JACQUES LOEB. 8vo. 128. 6.4. W, BIEDERMANN. Translated by F. A. 'WELB).

In 2 Vols. 175. net each.

net.

COURSE OF ELEMENTARY

IOS. net.

4. ба.

net.

« PreviousContinue »