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THE DAVIS-JULIEN SERIES OF READERS

DAYS WITH UNCLE JACK

BY

JOHN W. DAVIS
District Superintendent of Schools, New York City

part I
FOR FIFTH-YEAR CLASSES

D. C. HEATH & CO., PUBLISHERS

588431
The Davis-Julien Readers

FINGER PLAY READER. For First-Year Classes.

Part 1-140 pages.
Teacher's Edition.
Part II-140 pages.
Teacher's Edition.
Perception Cards:
Part 1—“Where is the Beehive?”

“Chickadee"
Part II—“The Fishes in the Brook”

“The Bow-woo and the Meow-oo”
SEA-BROWNIE READER. For Second-Year Classes.

Part 1-225 pages.

Part II-274 pages.
EVENINGS WITH GRANDMA. For Third-Year Classes.

Part 1—289 pages.

Part II-384 pages.
EVENINGS WITH GRANDPA. For Fourth-Year Classes.

Part 1–358 pages.

Part II—388 pages.
DAYS WITH UNCLE JACK. For Fifth-Year Classes.

Part 1–440 pages.

The author wishes to acknowledge his indebtedness to Messrs. Houghton,
Mifflin Company, by whose permission, under a special arrangement, he has been
able to use the selections from Longfellow, Emerson, and Holmes, appearing in this
reader; and also to Messrs. D. Appleton and Company for the quotation on page
16 from the works of Ullmann.

COPYRIGHT, 1914, BY
D. C. HEATH & COMPANY

TO THE TEACHER

The qualities of good reading are: (1) Correct pronunciation; (2) distinct enunciation; (3) clear articulation; (4) proper pitch; and (5) right expression, this including tone, modulation, speed, emphasis, and inflection.

Provided a pupil does not have defective hearing, or a defect in his organs of speech, and is not lacking in the power of concentration, he should be a good reader. If he is not a good reader the fault may be in any one or all of the points laid down.

Proper phonic drill will correct mistakes under the first four heads. Proper understanding of the subject matter read by the pupil should enable him to read with right expression. Sometimes, however, there are pupils who need the help of the teacher in this direction. Then the pupil's faculty of imitation may be brought into play, the teacher reading and the pupil imitating. .

The reading and the allied English work presented for the pupils should not be taken up at the same time, for they are different subjects. It is not intended that the work prescribed at the end of each Day should be finished in one lesson. It may take four or five.

The addenda, pp. 419–430, afford much material for the use of pupils who are weak in phonics or tone production.

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