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that there is something about the Unitarian system which recommends it more to the head of the roving speculatist, than to the heart of the humble and devout inquirer; to the would-be theologian, and the metaphysical amateur, rather than to the man who is " renewed in the spirit of his mind," and desirous to "perfect holiness in the fear of God."-In this view, the admission harmonizes remarkably with the style in which former Unitarian writers have expressed themselves:

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"It cannot be denied," says Dr. Priestley, " that many of "those who judge so truly concerning particular tenets in "religion, have attained to that cool, unbiassed temper of "mind, in consequence of becoming more indifferent to re❝ligion in general, and to all the modes and doctrines of "it.""Men who are indifferent to the practice of reli"gion," says Mr. Belsham," and whose minds, therefore, "are least attached to any set of principles, will ever be "the first to see the absurdity of a "popular superstition, "and to embrace a rational system of faith."And do not these admissions, and that of Mr. Yates, still correspond, in a remarkable manner, with existing facts? Who are, in general, the converts to Unitarianism? Do they not still, as when Mr. Fuller published his comparative view of the Calvinistic and Socinian Systems, consist chiefly of "a spe"culating sort of people among professing Christians?" Where are the hardened sinners whose consciences it has awakened? Where are the profligates whom it has reclaimed? Where are the worldlings whom it has spiritualized? Where are the Jews, the Deists, the infidels, whom it has brought to the faith and obedience of the truth? And, even with regard to those who have, from time to time, gone

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what improvement, we may ask, has the transition produced? Has it increased their humility? Has it warmed and elevated their devotion? Has it purified their affections from the debasing alloy of the world, and made them more heavenlyminded? Has it enlivened their delight in communion with God, and heightened their attachment to the exercises of the closet, the family, and the sanctuary? Has it rendered them more thankful in prosperity, more resigned and patient in adversity? Has it enlarged their practical benevolence? Has it made them more "fervent in spirit" for the glory of God, and the good of men ?more "sober, just, "holy, temperate ?"-better husbands and wives; better parents and children; better brothers and sisters; better masters and servants; better members of society;—in a word, better men, than they were before?—I make my appeal to the consciences of these converts to Unitarianism themselves, and, with all humility and affection, intreat them to examine themselves, and to compare, in their own experience, the respective tendencies of the system which they have renounced, and, of that which they have espoused, And I make my appeal, at the same time, to all my fellowChristians who have had any opportunities for personal observation." Among the various Socinian converts, have "we ever been used to hear of any remarkable change "of life or behaviour, which a conversion to their peculiar "principles effected? I hope there are few Calvinistic congregations in the kingdom, but what could point out "examples of persons among them, who, at the time of ing over to their doctrinal principles, came m the course of this world, and have ever ess of life. Can this be said of the

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n congregations? Those who have

that there is something about the Unitarian system which recommends it more to the head of the roving speculatist, than to the heart of the humble and devout inquirer; to the would-be theologian, and the metaphysical amateur, rather than to the man who is " renewed in the spirit of his mind," and desirous to "perfect holiness in the fear of God.”—In this view, the admission harmonizes remarkably with the style in which former Unitarian writers have expressed themselves :

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"It cannot be denied," says Dr. Priestley," that many of "those who judge so truly concerning particular tenets in "religion, have attained to that cool, unbiassed temper of "mind, in consequence of becoming more indifferent to re❝ligion in general, and to all the modes and doctrines of "it."" Men who are indifferent to the practice of reli"gion," says Mr. Belsham, "and whose minds, therefore, "are least attached to any set of principles, will ever be "the first to see the absurdity of a "popular superstition, "and to embrace a rational system of faith."-And do not these admissions, and that of Mr. Yates, still correspond, in a remarkable manner, with existing facts? Who are, in general, the converts to Unitarianism? Do they not still, as when Mr. Fuller published his comparative view of the Calvinistic and Socinian Systems, consist chiefly of "a spe"culating sort of people among professing Christians?" Where are the hardened sinners whose consciences it has awakened? Where are the profligates whom it has reclaimed? Where are the worldlings whom it has spiritualized? Where are the Jews, the Deists, the infidels, whom it has brought to the faith and obedience of the truth? And, even with regard to those who have, from time to time, gone over to its adherents from the various denominations of professing Christians,

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what improvement, we may ask, has the transition produced? Has it increased their humility? Has it warmed and elevated their devotion? Has it purified their affections from the debasing alloy of the world, and made them more heavenlyminded? Has it enlivened their delight in communion with God, and heightened their attachment to the exercises of the closet, the family, and the sanctuary? Has it rendered them more thankful in prosperity, more resigned and patient in adversity? Has it enlarged their practical benevolence? Has it made them more "fervent in spirit" for the glory of God, and the good of men? more "sober, just, "holy, temperate ?"-better husbands and wives; better parents and children; better brothers and sisters; better masters and servants; better members of society;-in a word, better men, than they were before?—I make my appeal to the consciences of these converts to Unitarianism themselves, and, with all humility and affection, intreat them to examine themselves, and to compare, in their own experience, the respective tendencies of the system which they have renounced, and, of that which they have espoused. And I make my appeal, at the same time, to all my fellowChristians who have had any opportunities for personal observation." Among the various Socinian converts, have "we ever been used to hear of any remarkable change "of life or behaviour, which a conversion to their peculiar "principles effected? I hope there are few Calvinistic con"gregations in the kingdom, but what could point out "examples of persons among them, who, at the time of "their coming over to their doctrinal principles, came "over also from the course of this world, and have ever "since lived in newness of life. Can this be said of the

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generality of Socinian congregations? Those who have

"had the greatest opportunity of observing them, say the "contrary. Yea, they add, that the conversion of sinners "to a life of holiness, does not appear to be their aim; that "their concern seems to be, to persuade those who, in their "account, have too much religion, that less will suffice, rather "than to address themselves to the irreligious, to convince "them of their defect." *

If the efficacy of Unitarianism, as an instrument of moral and spiritual improvement, is to be estimated by the effects which it is seen to produce amongst ourselves, we shall be at a loss for grounds to account for, or to justify, the recent eagerness of its proselyting spirit. Differences of sentiment, in the opinion of most Unitarians, are of little essential account in the matter of salvation; and conversion to the principles of Unitarianism, has, it would appear, no such influence upon the converts as to make any material change for the better in their character. Whence, then, the active zeal of its friends? To what is this zeal directed? What valuable ends do they expect to accomplish by it? Of what mighty consequence is a mere change of sentiment and profession, if the change does not materially, if at all, affect, either the safety or the character of him who undergoes it? Those who hold the divinity and atonement of Christ, and the doctrine of acceptance with God through his merits and mediation, are consistent in their zeal, because they consider these Scripture truths as essentially connected

* Fuller's "Calvinistic and Socinian Systems examined and compared, as to their “Moral Tendency;" a work which cannot be too often or too strongly recommended to the attention of the reader; a work, to which the palm must still be assigned amongst the productions of its able and lamented Author; a work “to which,” in the language of Dr. Johnson respecting Lord Lyttleton's observations on the conversion of Paul, Unitarianism "has never yet been able to frame even a specious “answer."

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