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DUBLIN.

zones, these being, in ascending order, the Nairn, Alves,

and Rosebrae beds. Reference was made to the affinity of Royal Dublin Society, March 21.-Sir Howard Grubb,

the Rosebrae fish-fauna with that of Dura Den, the yellow F.R.S., in the chair.-(a) The temperature of healthy dairy

sandstones of which locality constitute the highest member cattle, (b) the temperature of tuberculous cattle, not

of the Upper Old Red of Fifeshire. Dr. Traquair specially clinically affected : Prof. G. H. Wooldridge. The author

desired to acknowledge his great indebtedness to Mr. W. made 520 observations on 63 healthy dairy cattle which

Taylor, of Lhanbryde, without whose assistance in furnishwere subsequently submitted to the tuberculin test, and

ing material the paper could not have been prepared.—The failing to react were considered free from the disease.

constitution of complex salts, i., derivatives of the sesquiHis conclusions are that the temperature may vary between

oxides : A. T. Cameron. Retger's method of investi100°4 F. and 100°8 F., with an average mean temperature of 10104 F. Feeding Feeding 'caused an average rise of 0°.3 F. gating isomorphous mixtures was applied to the blue

chromoxalates of ammonium and potassium, and showed above the temperature of the same cattle at the same time on other days, but not feeding. In the afternoon,

that they had no definite composition, there being, there

fore, no conclusive reason for doubling the formulæ of between 4 and 5 o'clock, the average temperature was

these and similar compounds. The striking analogy 0°5 higher than at 8 a.m. Pregnant cows had an average

between the so-called double fluorides, chlorides, cyanides, temperature 0°.3 F. higher than the average of the other

&c., and the complex derivatives of dibasic acids was cattle in the same building. Tuberculous cattle numbering

pointed out. It was shown that to almost all such com74, apparently perfectly healthy, but subsequently reacting to tuberculin, were the subjects of 505 observations. These pounds, whether derived from monobasic or dibasic acids,

simple constitutions can be assigned by supposing the animals had a much wider range of variations. The

hydroxyl radicals of the metallic hydroxide to be replaced average was 101°:7 F. The lowest observed was 100°-4 F. and the highest 104°:3 F. The widest range of an in

by complex groups.-Theorems relating to a generalisation dividual was from 100°.7 F. to 104°3 F., with an average

of Bessel's function, ii. : Rev. F. H. Jackson. of 102°:2 F. (temperature taken 15 times).

Out of 137

March 6.-Lord M'Laren in the chair.--A study of three apparently healthy dairy cattle, 74 (54 per cent.) reacted to vegetarian diets : Drs. Noël Paton and J. C. Dunlop. tuberculin, thus emphasising the advisability of using that Of the three diets described, one was a totally insufficient agent in attempts to obtain a dairy free from tuberculosis.

diet of bananas, a second was a fairly typical vegetarian On the petrological examination of macadam : Prof. J.

diet showing the difficulty of avoiding an excess of sugary Joly, F.R.S. Various specimens of macadam used on food, and the third was the far from economical diet of a Scottish roads have been examined. The general results vegetarian glutton. These were compared with the diets of the investigation are to elucidate the characteristics of of the labouring classes in cities as illustrated by the these macadams, as well as apparent abnormalities of

author's own investigations in Edinburgh, and those of behaviour, and to demonstrate the value of petrological Rowntree, Alswater, and Lumsden respectively in York, methods in such cases. On the construction of fume- New York, and Dublin, and as regards rural districts by chambers with effective ventilation : Prof. W. N. Hartley,

Wilson Fox's report. It was shown that these normal F.R.S. The results of a series of experiments on ventil- diets more nearly approached the physiological standard ation and of practical experience with fume-chambers have

than the vegetarian diets studied.—A further contribution shown the conditions which are necessary for the removal

to the fresh-water plankton of the Scottish lochs : W. and of noxious fumes from a chemical laboratory with the G. S. West. The thirty-six lochs studied were in the greatest efficiency and the least possible trouble and

north-west Highlands. There

abundance of expense. Measurements were made daily over a period of

Desmids, a fact attributed to the geological character of six months of the gas burnt, the air extracted, the differ

the country. The Protococcoideæ were not abundant, in ence between inside and outside temperatures, the baro

marked contrast to what occurs in Continental Europe. metric pressure, the direction of the wind and its strength. Diatoms were very abundant, and did not disappear in The direction and dimensions of the flues, and the relation

May and June. Myxophyceæ, again, were relatively few. of the passage of air up the flues to the cubic contents

The Swedish lakes alone approached the Scottish in the of the chambers, are stated. The average quantity of air

richness of the plankton. The Danish plankton was reexhausted per minute was 354 cubic feet per chamber of latively much poorer in Chlorophyceæ, especially Conju51 cubic feet, and on an average the air of each chamber

gates. This was to be attributed principally to the fact is completely changed every nine seconds. The small

that the geological formations are mostly of Tertiary age. height of the flues, being 25 feet, renders such a means

-On the Sarcodina of Loch Ness : Dr. E. Penard. Of of ventilation as that described readily adaptable to small

a list of nearly fifty species of Rhizopods and Heliozoa out-buildings, such as school laboratories. Details are

obtained at depths of upwards of 250 feet, several were of given as to the construction of flues with a descending

interest on account of their rarity, some being found for draught as fitted to a lecture table and fume-chamber in

the first time in Europe, others being previously known a lecture room.—On the structure of water-jets and the only from the Lake of Geneva. The majority of the effect of sound upon them, part ii. : Philip E. Belas.

Rhizopoda had probably been derived from the shallow

margins of the lake or from the neighbouring peat bogs ; EDINBURGH.

but some half dozen species or varieties were regarded as Royal Society, February 20. -Sir John Murray in the

peculiar to the abyssal portions of large lakes.--The chair.-On the graptolite-bearing rocks of the South

Rhizopods and Heliozoa of Loch Ness : J. Murray. In Orkney Islands : Dr. J. Harvey Pirie. The presence of

this paper the list of species given in the previous paper

by Penard was supplemented by a number of species Silurian sedimentary rocks in these isolated islands indicates a former much greater extension of land in the

observed by the Lake Survey, bringing the list of Loch area lying to the south-east of Cape Horn. The fossils

Ness Sarcodina up to sixty-six species. The difficulty of Pleurograptus and Discinocaris indicate their age as corre

accounting for the transmission of peculiar abyssal forms sponding to the Caradoc or Lower Llandovery, and the

from one deep lake to another was met by the suggestion structure of the rocks suggests that they belong to the

that the abyssal forms originate separately in each lake same series as the Silurian rocks of the Argentine.

and are probably not good permanent species, but modified Palæontology of the Upper Old Red Sandstone of the

forms due to the direct action of the environment on the Moray Firth area : Dr. R. H. Traquair. The fossils dis

growing individual. cussed in this paper, which embodied the research of the

PARIS. past fourteen years, were almost entirely fish remains, Academy of Sciences, April 17.-M. Troost in the chair. other remains, in the shape of badly preserved plants and --Second note on the principle of cellular flotation in certain tracks, probably of invertebrate animals, being ships : M. Bertin.-Mixed treatment by arsenious acid rare. Twenty-one species of fish were recorded, of which and trypan red of infection due to Trypanosoma : A. only seven were known from the Upper Old Red of this Laveran. Fresh experiments on monkeys confirm the region when the author took up the subject. The favourable results previously obtained on rats and dogs.character of the fish remains suggested the division of the Observations on the new comet Giacobini (1905, March 26) strata of the Moray Firth Upper Old Red into three made at Toulouse Observatory: F. Rossard.--On the 624

one

differential equation y" + 2A(x)y=0 : Max Mason. On the E. A. Minchin.-Some Notes upon the Anatomy of the Ferret-Badge

(Helictis personata): F. E. Beddard, F.R.S. -Contributions to the relation which exists between the velocity of combustion

Osteology of Birds, Part vii., Eurylæmidæ, with Remarks on the Sy> of powders and the pressure : R. Liouville.—Optical tematic

Position of the Group : W. P. Pycraft. properties of iono-plastic iron : L. Houllevigue.-On the ROYAL INSTITUTION, at 5.-The Study of Extinct Animals : Prof. LC

Miall, F.R.S. theory and imitation of the motion of sails : A. Bazin.

SOCIETY OF ARTS, at 4.30.—The Monumental Treatmeot of Bronre: J. On the use of the centrifugal method in the analysis of

Starkie Gardner. cocoa and chocolate : F. Bordas and M. Touplain. It is

WEDNESDAY, MAY 3. necessary, to avoid some practically impossible filtrations,

ENTOMOLOGICAL Society, at 8.-The Structure and Life-bistory of Porn to use an apparatus capable of nearly 2000 revolutions a

choda sexpunctata, Curtis : J. A. Dell. minute.- New method for a quick analysis of milk: F. SOCIETY OF PUBLIC ANALYSTS, at 8.

Society of Arts, at 8. — Recent Excavations in Rome : Mrs. Burton-Brows. Bordas and M. Touplain. By centrifugal means avoids much filtration as well as the protracted desiccation

THURSDAY, MAY 4. of the casein.-An apparatus for giving warning of the

ROYAL INSTITUTION, at 5.-Flame : Sir James Dewar, F.R.S. presence of luminous gas and afterdamp: MM. Hanger CHEMICAL Society, at 8.-The Synthesis of Substances Allied to and Pescheux.—The crystalloluminescence of arsenious Adrenaline : H. D. Dakin.-Methylation of p-Aminobenzoic Acid hyn acid : M. Guinchant. This appears to be due to a

Means of Methyl Sulphate : J. Johnston.-Some Notes on Sodium Alus

J. N. Wadmore. ---Camphoryl-v-Semicarbazide : M. O. Forster and chemical phenomenon corresponding with the reversible H. E. Fierz. reaction

RÖNTGEN Society, at 5, (1) to Medical Members only. Forty-two cases of As, 0, +6HCIZ3H,O+2AsCig.

Ureteral Calculus Diagnosis by X-Rays proved by Operation on the

Passage of the Calculi; (2) at 8.15 p.m., to the General Meeting -On the emission spectrum of the high tension electric Measurement and Technique in Therapeutic Dosage : Dr. C. Le ter

Leonard, Philadelphia. arc : J. de Rowalski and P. Joye.-On simple method

LINNEAN Society, at 8.-Ecology: its Present Position and Probable for the study of oscillating sparks : G. A. Hemsalech. Development: A. G. Tansley.-The Flora of Gough Island: R NR The method depends on the fact that a current of air Brown. directed on such a spark can separate out the oscillations.

Civil AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERS' SOCIETY, at 7.30.-Annual General

Meeting. -At 8.--Card-Indexing and Filing: J. C. Osborne. -Apparatus and methods in the medical applications of statical electricity : L. Benoist. An attempt to systematise

FRIDAY, MAY 5. the usage based on the consideration of electric density.

ROYAL INSTITUTION, at 9.- Problems underlying Nutrition : Prof. K. E -On the mode of formation of some monosubstituted

Armstrong, F.R.S. derivatives of urethane : F. Bodroux. When small

SATURDAY, MAY 6. quantities of ethyl carbonate are dropped into an ether ROVAL INSTITUTION, at 3.-Moulds and Mouldiness : Prof. Marsta solution of the magnesium derivative of an aromatic Ward, F.R.S. primary amine, a lively reaction takes place. If aniline be used, phenylurethane is formed.-On the mineralogical analysis of arable earths: J. Dumont. The author

CONTENTS.

PAGE describes methods for quantitatively determining the proportions of sand, mica, felspar, quartz, &c.-On

Three Cambridge Mathematical Works. By Prof. some

G. H. Bryan, F.R.S.

601 Crustacea resulting from the expedition of the Princess Alice : H. Coutière. By the use of a net with

Rein's “ Japan.”. By Dr. Henry Dyer

603 a large aperture a considerably more valuable collection

Making a Pasture .

604 was made.-On the excitation of nerves by a minimum of

Sociology. By F. W. H.

605

Our Book Shelf :energy, and its application to electrodiagnosis : M. Cluzet. By experiments made on the nerves of human beings, it

Balfour : "First Report of the Wellcome Research has been found through the application of a formula that

Laboratories at the Gordon Memorial College, the duration of minimum excitation may be 0.00020 second.

Khartoum.”—Prof. R. T. Hewlett

603 Grindon: “Till the Sun Grows Cold"

606 -Physiology of the spleen : MM. Charrin and Moussu. The experiments made tended to elucidate the much dis

Gregory : A Short Introduction to the Theory of
Electrolytic Dissociation "

606 cussed question as to the functional relationship between the liver and the spleen.—The action of intestinal fluid on

Letters to the Editor :enteric secretion : A. Frouin. Many facts seem to prove

Electromagnetics in a Moving Dielectric.-Oliver that this exciting action is not due to secretin.---Researches

Heaviside, F.R.S.

606 on animal lactase : H. Bierry. The experiments show

The Dynamical Theory of Gases.-J. H. Jeans 60 that lactase is not contained in the pancreatic juice of

Growth of a Wave-group when the Group-velocity is suckling puppies.—On the production of alcohol and

Negative.—Dr. H. C. Pocklington

607 acetone by muscles : F. Maignan. The author replies in

The Transposition of Zoological Names. -Dr. R. the affirmative to the question as to whether these sub

Lydekker, F.R.S. .

608 stances, which are normally present in muscle tissue, arise

A little known Property of the Gyroscope. - Prof. by alcoholic fermentation of glucose by the agency of proto

William H. Pickering, plasm. But while the acetone continues to be formed, the

Have Chemical Compounds a Definite Critical Temalcohol is sooner or later destroyed again.

perature and Pressure of Decomposition?-Geoffrey Martin

609

Experiment on Pressure due to Waves.- Sidney DIARY OF SOCIETIES.

Skinner

609 Tantalum. (Illustrated.) By Dr. F. Mollwo Perkin 610 THURSDAY, APRIL 27.

Primitive Water-Supply. (Illustrated.) INSTITUTION OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS, at 8.--Discussion : Mr. B. J. Henry Benedict Medlicott, F.R.S. By W. T. B. . 612 Arnold's Address to the Joint Meeting at St. Louis on the Problem of the Alternate Current Motor applied to Traction. --Paper: The Alternate

Notes

613 Current Series Motor: F. Creedy.

Our Astronomical Column:

Astronomical Occurrences in May.
FRIDAY, APRIL 28.

Elements and Ephemeris for Comet 1905 a (Giacobini) 617 EPIDEMIOLOGICAL Society, at 8.30.

Changes on Mars .
MONDAY, MAY 1.

Photography of Planetary Nebula
ROYAL INSTITUTION, at 5.--Annual Meeting.

Radial Velocities of “ Standard velocity Stars" SOCIETY OF CHEMICAL INDUSTRY, at 8.-(1) The Study of the Action of Magnitude Equation in the Right Ascensions of the Hydrogen peroxide on a Photographic Plate in the Dark; (2) On the

Eros Stars
Influence of the Length of the Time of Development on the Degree of
Darkening of the Photographic Plate : Prof. Chiri Otsuki.

Memoirs on Marine Biology
Victoria Institute, at 4-30. — The Influence of Physiological Discovery | The Physical History of the Victoria Falls.
on Thought : Dr. E. P. Frost.

trated). TUESDAY, May 2.

Seismological Notes ZOOLOGICAL Society, at 8.30.-On Leucosolenia contorta, Bowerbank,

Societies and Academies Ascandra contorta, Haeckel, and Ascetta spinosa, Lendenfeld : Prof Diary of Societies

608

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Nereis, Aphrodite, Arenicola, Lanice, Terebella ; Lepas, Balanus,
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Pectens Bugula, Crisia, Pedicellina, Holothuria, Asterias, Echinus.
Ascidia, Salpa (preserved), Scyllium, Kaia, &c., &c.

For prices and more detailed lists apply to
Biological Laboratory, Plymouth.

THE DIRECTOR.

DESCRIPTIVE PAMPHLET post free.

Sole Makers-
6 CROSS STREET, FINSBURY

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