Page images
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors][merged small]

A

VENETIAN TALE.

[TAKEN FROM THE FRENCH.]

By
PERCIVAL Q .

/ *

, * u .J

IN TWO VOLUMES.
VOL. I.

Ever renown blows a note of fame,
And a note of fear, when she sounds his name:
Much of bloodshed and much of scathe,
Have been their lot who have waked bis wrath.
Harold The Dauntless.

NEW-YORK:

miKTED BY C. S. VAN WINKLE,
101 Greenwich Street.

Southern District </ f/en-York, a.

BE IT REMEMBERED, that on the twentieth day of December, in the forty-fourth year of the Independence of the United States of America, C. S Van W Inki.k, of the said district, hath deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit: "Giovanni Sbogarro. A Venetian Tale. [Taken from the

French.] By Percival G . In two volumes.

Ever renown blows a note of fame,
And a nbte of fear, when she sounds his name:
Much of bloodshed and much of scathe,
Have been their lot who have waked his wrath.

Harold the Dauntless."

In conformity to the act of Congress of the United States, entitled, " An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned;" and also, to an act, entitled, "An act supplementary 1o an act, entitled, an act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned, and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and other prints.11 GILBERT LIVINGSTON THOMPSON, Clerk of the Southern District of New-York.

[graphic]

PREFACE.

The hero of the following tale appeared like a comet in the northern part of Italy, just before the close of the last century, and at the moment of the downfall of the Venetian Republic.

The present account of him is taken from an anonymous I1"reach work, but with great alterations. The reasons for these variations cannot be given without anticipating the events of the story and impairing its interest; while they would, in all probability, be entirely unimportant to the reader.

Those persons who have visited Venice, and that part of the Istrian coast which was the particular scene of his exploits, and have made themselves minutely acquainted with the strange accounts of Giovanni Sbogarro, which are still in every mouth, will perceive how nearly the present narrative comes to the real history of that extraordinary man, in as far as it has ever been elucidated to the public.

LEGE, CKEDE, ET VALE!

« PreviousContinue »