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TO

TRANSACTIONS

OF THE

AMERICAN INSTITUTE

OF

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS

1901 TO 1910 INCLUSIVE

VOLUME 2

PUBLISHED BY THE
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS

33 West THIRTY-NINTH STREET
New YORK, N. Y., U. S. A.

1913

Copyright, 1913

by the
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS

INTRODUCTION

This index of the TRANSACTIONS consists of two separate parts, each intended for a distinct purpose.

First. There is an index of papers in which they are classified in natural groups and arranged chronologically in each group.

Second. There is an index of specific data and information arranged alphabetically.

The index of papers is intended for searchers desiring to locate papers on a given subject, and to aid in this search the papers have been characterized. These characterizations are not intended to be abstracts of the papers, but rather to give the scope and nature of their contents. The titles of many papers are misleading, and it is hoped thus to call the searcher's attention to the real nature of the contents, thus saving him much time in looking up useless references.

The index of specific data and information is intended for searchers desiring to make a complete study of the subject as presented in the TRANSACTIONS. There is a great mass of valuable information hidden in discussions which have no very direct connection with the subject of the paper. This data can be found only by reference to such a topical index.

Methods of classification of engineering information are as numerous as the people who have studied the subject. A logically arranged classification for this index seemed impossible. Accordingly all information was grouped into natural classes and very complete cross indexing was provided. The searcher will thus be lead to the desired information whatever may be his ideas of a proper arrangement.

The classification of the papers was determined by sorting them for the entire period covered by the index. Any group containing a large number of papers was subdivided. All papers were arranged chronologically to enable the searcher to pass over the early papers that might be too old for

his use.

Naturally, many papers, especially when considered together with their discussions, fell into a number of different groups. In all such cases they were put into as many places as it was thought they might possibly belong If there was any doubt one way or the other, a paper was always put in.

There is no harm in having a paper under a heading where someone thinks it should not be, so long as it is also under the heading where that person thinks it ought to be. For instance, many high-tension systems ordinarily considered transmission lines, are to all intents and purposes distribution systems. In the future they will undoubtedly be considered

such as we now consider as distribution systems those which some years ago we looked upon as transmission lines. Accordingly, papers dealing with high-tension distribution systems are listed both under transmission and distribution.

The topical index is not a classified index in the ordinary sense. However, all of the information is properly grouped in an alphabetical manner. The conditions it was intended to carry out were as follows:

1. To index all useful specific data and information contained in the TRANSACTIONS.

2. To arrange the index items in such a manner that anybody could find them with a minimum of trouble.

In the attempt to meet these conditions the following general rules were observed :

1. All subjects are indexed under the noun, and where an adjective is practically inseparably associated with a noun by usage, it has been incorporated with it by a hyphen.

2. All references to a given subject are listed in the same place, so that having found one reference the searcher can rest assured that he has found all.

3. Apparatus and phenomena known by several names are grouped under one name and the other names inserted in the index with cross references. For instance, inductance coils, reactance coils, reactive coils, choke coils, reactors will all be found in the index with cross references to Reactors.

4. Apparatus and phenomena common to two or more subjects are grouped by themselves and cross references inserted under the related subjects. Thus, commutation is indexed by itself with cross references under generators, d. c.; motors, a. C.; motors, d. c.

5. Apparatus and phenomena of sufficient importance in themselves are indexed alone with cross references under the main heads of which they form a sub-division. Thus, catenary construction is indexed under catenary construction with cross reference under distribution, railway.

6. All properties of materials and apparatus are indexed under the name of the material or apparatus, except where the references are to the characteristics of the properties themselves. Therefore, a searcher will find under the name of a material all the properties of that material given in the TRANSACTIONS.

7. No distinction is made between singular and plural in arrangement of the items.

An attempt has thus been made to make it impossible for a searcher not to find all the information which is contained in the TRANSACTIONS. Actual use of the index can alone determine the success or failure of this undertaking. But, however unsuccessful in this particular, it is believed that this index will greatly increase the value of the TRANSACTIONS.

1. EDUCATION

PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS

Charles P. Steinmetz

Vol. xix-1902, pp. 1145-1150 Description of the shortcomings in present methods of teaching engineering in colleges. Outline of an ideal course in electrical engineering.

Discussion, incorporated with that of paper by E. B. Raymond on “A Proposed Reform in Technical Training."

CONCERNING UNIFORMITY IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COURSES

IN THE UNITED STATES Samuel Sheldon

Vol. xix - 1902, pp. 1151-1154 Purpose of engineering schools. Statistics bearing on the uniformity of courses in different colleges, and brief discussion of the kind of training required by engineers.

Discussion, incorporated with that of paper by E. B. Raymond on “A Proposed Reform in Technical Training.”

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COURSES AT COLLEGE AND THE EDUCATION

OF THE ELECTRICAL ENGINEER William Esty

Vol. xix--1902, pp. 1155-1164 General outline of ideal method of instructing engineering students; kind of studies, laboratory method; seminary method; theses, etc.

Discussion, incorporated with that of paper by E. B. Raymond on "A Proposed Reform in Technical Training."

THE EDUCATION OF THE ELECTRICAL ENGINEER Harold W. Buck

Vol. xix-1902, pp. 1165-1168 General outline of a course of training for electrical engineers, beginning with preparatory school, continuing through college and ending with an apprenticeship course.

Discussion, incorporated with that of paper by E. B. Raymond on "A Proposed Reform in Technical Training."

A PROPOSED REFORM IN TECHNICAL TRAINING Edward B. Raymond

Vol. xix–1902, pp. 1169-1173 Plan advocating early entry into studies along a given line, and urging specialization throughout entire educational period.

Discussion (including that of Samuel Sheldon on “Concerning Uniformity on Electrical Engineering Courses in the United States,” Presidential Address, by Charles P. Steinmetz, paper by William Esty on “Electrical Engineering Courses at College and the Education of the Electrical Engineer"; and paper by Harold W. Buck on “The Education of the Electrical Engineer"), pp. 1175-1210, by Messrs. Chas. P. Steinmetz, F. A. C. Perrine, E. B. Raymond, Morgan Brooks, William Stanley,

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