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THE FIRST PHILIPPIC

WITH AN INTRODUCTION AND NOTES.

EDITED, AFTER

C. REHDANTZ,

BY THE

REV. T. GWATKIN, M. A.

LATE FELLOW OF ST JOHN'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE.

London:

MACMILLAN AND CO.

1883

[All Rights reserved.]

BACK R

16JUN&

OXFOR

Καὶ δή ποτε καὶ ἐπεθιμήθην, τί ποτε τοὺς τότ' ἀνθρώπους (the contemporaries of Demosthenes) ἀκούοντας αὐτοῦ λέγοντος ταῦτα πάσχειν εἰκὸς ἦν. ὅπου γὰρ ἡμεῖς, οἱ τοσοῦτον ἀπηρτημένοι τοῖς χρόνοις καὶ οὐδὲν πρὸς τὰ πράγματα πεποιθότες, οὕτως ὑπαγόμεθα καὶ κρατούμεθα καὶ ὅποι ποτ ̓ ἂν ἡμᾶς ὁ λόγος ἄγη πορευόμεθα πως τότε Αθηναϊοί τε καὶ οἱ ἄλλοι Έλληνες ήγοντο ὑπὸ τοῦ ἀνδρὸς ἐπὶ τῶν ἀληθινῶν τε καὶ ἰδίων ἀγώνων, αὐτοῦ λέγοντος ἐκείνου τὰ ἑαυτοῦ μετὰ τῆς ἀξιώσεως ἧς εἶχε, τὴν αὐτοπάθειαν καὶ τὸ παράστημα τῆς ψυχῆς ἀποδεικνυμένου, κοσμοῦντος ἀπαντα καὶ χρωματί ζοντος τῇ πρεπούσῃ ὑποκρίσει, ἧς δεινότατος ἀσκητὴς ἐγένετο—Εἰ δὴ τὸ διὰ τοσούτων ἐτῶν ἐγκαταμισγόμενον τοῖς βιβλίοις πνεῦμα τοσαύτην ἰσχὺν ἔχει καὶ οὕτως ἄγον ἐπὶ τῶν αὐτῶν (corrupt), ή που τότε ὑπερφυές τι καὶ δεινὸν χρῆμα ἦν ἐπὶ τῶν ἐκείνου λόγων.

Διονυσίου τοῦ ̔Αλικαρνασσέως

περὶ τῆς λεκτικῆς Δημοσθένους δεινότητος κ. 22.

CAMBRIDGE: PRINTED BY C. J. CLAY, Μ.Α. & SON, AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS.

PREFACE.

THE Notes in this volume are, with few excep. tions, paraphrased from those of the late C. Rehdantz in his Neun Philippische Reden.' His text (sixth edition, Leipzig, 1881) has been followed throughout. The sixth edition has had the great advantage of Professor Blass's revision as far as the end of the first part, which contains the Olynthiacs and the first Philippic. The second part contains the remainder of the Philippics and two ample indexes, one rhetorical and stylistic, the other grammatical and lexical. Wherever Rehdantz refers to these indexes in his notes to Phil. I. I have extracted the substance of the passages referred to.

The text adheres closely to the Parisian codex Σ and the Florentine L, see Introd. ch. vi. The Introduction consists of a selection, translated from that of Rehdantz, omitting the earlier and later portions which bear less directly on the first Philippic. The aim of the Introduction is, "in regard to Athenian history in general, to place the reader as nearly as possible on the same standpoint as that occupied by the hearer just before the beginning of the speech. Thus, as Demosthenes was a political orator, an outline is given of the political relations amidst which he moved and acted, and of all matters of fact and

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