Page images
PDF
EPUB

B 793 . 753

copy

gantry

BY KUNO FISCHER

DESCARTES AND HIS SCHOOL

Translated from the Third and Revised German Edition

BY

J. P. GORDY, Ph.D.

PROFESSOR OF PEDAGOGICS IN OHIO UNIVERSITY

EDITED BY

NOAH PORTER, D.D., LL.D.

NEW YORK
CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS

1887
(Authorized Edition)

B В
;
F 533
Copy 3 3

COPYRIGHT, 1887,

BY CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS.

RAND AVERY OOMPANY
SLBOTROTYPERS AND PRINTERS

BOSTON.

add copy

INTRODUCTION.

Α'

MONG the many histories of philosopby for which we are

indebted to modern research, the history of Modern Philosophy by Professor Kuno Fischer of Heidelberg is conspicuous for the courage with which the author grapples with the difficulties of his task and the success with which he overcomes them. Though he is by no means removed from criticism or controversy in respect to the interpretation which he gives of the writers and schools which he encounters, and in the positive and pronounced estimates and criticisms which he does not hesitate to give of their leading positions, he is uniformly clear, spirited, and exhaustive. He is also popular in the best sense of the term, being neither technical nor abstract beyond the necessities imposed by his theme, and connecting with the thorough and masterly dis-cussion of schools and opinions as much of personal and general historic interest as could be expected or desired. For these reasons his history is, perhaps, more readable than any other, and is uniformly confessed by competent critics, whether friendly or otherwise, to be eminently attractive and exciting to the general student.

Hitherto only a small portion of this history has been translated into English, — for one reason among others, that the history itself is not yet complete, having as yet been finished to the end of Schelling's system and life, where it rests for obvious reasons with the author's unsatisfied desire satisfactorily to expound the development of the Hegelian theory of Being and of Knowledge. Meanwhile the result of his attempt to do this is awaited with more than ordinary interest by both the disciples and antagonists

« PreviousContinue »