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" He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient poets, had the largest and most comprehensive soul. All the images of nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily: when he describes anything, you more than see... "
The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text of the ... - Page xci
by William Shakespeare - 1803
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Cyclopędia of English Literature: A History, Critical and ..., Volume 3

Robert Chambers - English literature - 1879 - 428 pages
...dramatists are from the ' Essay on Dramatic Poesy ' (1668) : Shakspeare. To begin, then, with Shakspeare. He was the man who, of all modern, and perhaps ancient...them not laboriously, but luckily. 'When he describes anything, you more than see it — yon feel it toe. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give...
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Great Authors of All Ages: Being Selections from the Prose Works of Eminent ...

Samuel Austin Allibone - Authors - 1879 - 576 pages
...Seiccastle. ON SHAK8PEARE, BEAUMONT AND FLRTCHEB, AND BEN JON8ON. To begin, then, with Shakspeare. He r admirers somewhat of their panegyries, have at last, in spite of political anything, you more than see it, — you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning,...
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The Authorship of Shakespeare

James G. McManaway - Drama - 1994 - 64 pages
...sums up the situation neatly in his Of Dramatic Poesy, An Essay: To begin, then, with Shakespeare: he was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...them not laboriously, but luckily: when he describes anything, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give...
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Studies in Shakespeare, Bibliography, and Theatre

James G. McManaway - 1990 - 442 pages
...sums up die situation neatly in his Of Dramatic Poesy, An Essay: To begin, then, with Shakespeare: he was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...them not laboriously, but luckily: when he describes anything, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give...
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Textual Practice 10.3, Volume 10, Issue 3

Alan Sinfield - Literary Criticism - 1996 - 172 pages
...the regulatory and formulaic Corneille and other French writers: To begin then with Shakespeare. He was the man who, of all modern and perhaps ancient...him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily. . . . Those who accuse him to have wanted learning give him the greater commendation. He was naturally...
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Studying British Cultures: An Introduction

Susan Bassnett - Art - 1997 - 234 pages
...acknowledgement of a Shakespearean archetype. We are in some sense back with Dryden's claim that Shakespeare: 'was the man who of all Modern, and perhaps Ancient...comprehensive soul. All the Images of Nature were present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily'." I will now turn to another species...
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Studies in Criticism and Aest

Howard Anderson - Aesthetics - 1967 - 429 pages
...proportion in the name of the disegno interno, the inward drawing, or idea. 36 ) Shakespeare, says Dryden, was "the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...him, and he drew them, not laboriously, but luckily " 37 The distinction between luck and labor, made by Dryden in favor of luck and Shakespeare, exploited...
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Collected Works Of Samuel Alexander

Samuel Alexander - Philosophy - 2000 - 324 pages
...that heavenly music seemed to make. III. ON A POET From Dryden. To begin then with Shakespeare. He was the man who of all modern and perhaps ancient...comprehensive soul. All the images of nature were present to him, and he drew them not laboriously but luckily. When he describes anything, you more...
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The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare

Margreta de Grazia, Stanley Wells - Drama - 2001 - 352 pages
...- for his versification, his diction, his classical correctness - but that he loved Shakespeare: He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...him, and he drew them, not laboriously, but luckily . . . Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation: he was naturally...
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Restoration Literature: An Anthology

Paul Hammond - Drama - 2002 - 484 pages
...Beaumont and Fletcher. The present extract is spoken by Neander. To begin, then, with Shakespeare: he was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...them not laboriously, but luckily; when he describes anything, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning* give...
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