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" ... which debars them from its privileges. To live without feeling or exciting sympathy, to be fortunate without adding to the felicity of others, or afflicted without tasting the balm of pity, is a state more gloomy than solitude : it is not retreat,... "
the monthly review - Page 433
by SEVERAL HANDS - 1759
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The British Novelists: With an Essay, and Prefaces, Biographical ..., Volume 26

English literature - 1820
...disturb that society which debars them from its privileges. To live without feeling or exciting sympathy, to be fortunate without adding to the felicity of others, or afflicted without tasting the balm of pity, is a state more gloomy than solitude : it is not retreat, but exclusion from...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL. D.

Samuel Johnson - 1820
...disturb that society which debars them from its privileges. To live without feeling or exciting sympathy, to be fortunate without adding to the felicity of others, or afflicted without tasting the balm of pity, is a state more gloomy than soliBB 2 tude : it is not retreat, but exclusion...
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The Novels of Sterne, Goldsmith, Dr. Johnson, Mackenzie, Horace Walpole, and ...

Laurence Sterne - 1823 - 659 pages
...disturb that society which debars them from its privileges. To live without feeling or exciting sympathy, nd as it was not in his power to come tasting the balm of pity, is a state more gloomy than solitude ; it is not retreat, but exclusion from...
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The Vicar of Wakefield: A Tale

Oliver Goldsmith - 1823 - 214 pages
...disturb that society which debars them from its privileges. To live without feeling or exciting sympathy, to be fortunate without adding to the felicity of others, or afflicted without tasting the balm of pity, is a state more gloomy than solitude ; it is not retreat, but exclusion from...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, Volume 1

Samuel Johnson - 1825
...that society, Which debars them from its privileges. To live without feeling or exciting sympathy ; to be fortunate without adding to the felicity of others, or afflicted without tasting the balm of pity, is a state more gloomy than solitude: it is not retreat, but exclusion from...
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Examples of English Prose: From the Reign of Elizabeth to the Present Time ...

George Walker - English prose literature - 1825 - 615 pages
...disturb that society which debars them from its privileges. To live without feeling or exciting sympathy, to be fortunate without adding to the felicity of others, or afflicted without tasting the balm of pity, is a state more gloomy than solitude ; it is not retreat, but exclusion from...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: With Murphy's Essay, Volume 6

Samuel Johnson - 1825
...disturb that society which debars them from its privileges. To live without feeling or exciting sympathy, to be fortunate without adding to the felicity of others, or afflicted without tasting the balm of pity, is a state more gloomy than solitude : it is not retreat, but exclusion from...
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A new English grammar

Brandon Turner - 1840
...virtuous visor hide deep vice!" — Shak. LESSON III. " To live without feeling or exciting sympathy, to be fortunate without adding to the felicity of others, or afflicted vithout tasting the balm of pity, is a state more gloomy than solitude; it is not retreat, but exclusion...
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Histoire de Rasselas, prince d'Abyssinie

Samuel Johnson - 1846 - 389 pages
...disturb that society which debars them from its privileges. To live without feeling or exciting sympathy, to be fortunate without adding to the felicity of others , or afflicted without tasting the balm of pity, is a state more gloomy than solitude; it is not retreat , but exclusion from...
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Institutes of English Grammar Methodically Arranged

Goold Brown - English language - 1848 - 311 pages
...is not to be admitted among reasonable beings. — Id. To live without feeling or exciting sympathy, to be fortunate without adding to the felicity of others, or afflicted without tasting the balm of pity, is a state more gloomy than solitude ; it is not retreat, but exclusion from...
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