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" ... which debars them from its privileges. To live without feeling or exciting sympathy, to be fortunate without adding to the felicity of others, or afflicted without tasting the balm of pity, is a state more gloomy than solitude : it is not retreat,... "
the monthly review - Page 433
by SEVERAL HANDS - 1759
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A Whisper to a Newly Married Pair from a Widowed Wife ... Eighth edition

Clara Lucas Balfour - Marriage - 1850 - 183 pages
...reason, and all the sweets of life. " To live without feeling or exciting sympathy," says Dr. Johnson; "to be fortunate without adding to the felicity of others, or afflicted without tasting the balm of pity — is a state more gloomy than solitude : it is not retreat, but exclusion,...
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The Institutes of English Grammar, Methodically Arranged: With Examples for ...

Goold Brown - English language - 1851 - 311 pages
...is not to be admitted among reasonable beings.-j-.fcZ. To live without feeling or exciting sympathy, to be fortunate without adding to the felicity of others, or afflicted without tasting the balm of pily, is a state more gloomy than solitude^ it is not retreat, but exclusion from...
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A class-book of English prose, with biogr. notices, explanatory notes and ...

Robert Demaus - 1859
...disturb that society which debars them from its privileges. To live without feeling or exciting sympathy, to be fortunate without adding to the felicity of others, or afflicted without tasting the balm of pity, is a state more gloomy than solitude ; it is not retreat, but exclusion from...
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The Institutes of English Grammar

Goold Brown - 1860
...not to be admitted among reasonable beings. — Id. •To live without feeling or exciting sympathy, to be fortunate Without adding to the felicity of others, or afflicted without tasting the balm of pity, is a state more gloomy than solitude; It is not retreat, but exclusion from...
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The Prose and Prose Writers of Britain from Chaucer to Ruskin: With ...

Robert Demaus - English literature - 1860 - 552 pages
...that society which debars them from its privileges. To live •without feeling or exciting sympathy, to be fortunate without adding to the felicity of others, or afflicted without tasting the balm of pity, is a state more gloomy than solitude ; it is not retreat, but exclusion from...
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The Institutes of English Grammar ...: And a Key to the Oral Exercises, to ...

Goold Brown - English language - 1862 - 296 pages
...calamity which guilt has brought upon him!—Dr. Johnson. To live without feeling or exciting sympathy, to be fortunate without adding to the felicity of others, or afflicted without tasting the balm of pity, is a state more gloomy than solitude; it is not retreat, but exclusion from...
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Wisdom and Genius of Dr. Samuel Johnson: Selected from His Prose Writings

Samuel Johnson, William Alexander Clouston - 1875 - 298 pages
...common opportunities and gradual temptations. CELIBACY. To live without feeling or exciting sympathy, to be fortunate without adding to the felicity of others, or afflicted without tasting the balm of pity, is a state more gloomy than solitude ; it is not retreat, but exclusion from...
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The History of Rasselas. And Elizabeth

Samuel Johnson - 1876 - 395 pages
...disturb that society which debars them from its privileges. To live without feeling or exciting sympathy, to be fortunate without adding to the felicity of others, or afflicted without tasting the balm of pity, is a state more gloomy than solitude ; it is not retreat, but exclusion from...
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Materials and Models for Greek Prose Composition

Greek language - 1878 - 295 pages
...disturb that society which debars them from its privileges. To live without feeling or exciting sympathy, to be fortunate without adding to the felicity of others, or afflicted without tasting the balm of pity, is a state more gloomy than solitude ; it is not retreat, but exclusion from...
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Johnson. Select works, ed. with intr. and notes by A. Milnes. Lives of ...

Samuel Johnson - 1879
...disturb that society which debars them from its privileges. To live without feeling or exciting sympathy, to be fortunate without adding to the felicity of others, or afflicted without tasting the balm of pity, is a state more gloomy than solitude : it is not retreat, but exclusion from...
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