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" He must have been a man of a most wonderful comprehensive nature, because, as it has been truly observed of him, he has taken into the compass Of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in... "
Blackwood's Magazine - Page 630
1845
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The Poetical Works of John Dryden, Volume 2

John Dryden - English poetry - 1854
...of him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his...distinguished from each other ; and not only in their inch'nations, but in their very physiognomies and persons. Baptista Porta could not have described...
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The Poetical Works of John Dryden, Volume 1

John Dryden - 1855
...of him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury tales the various manuers and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his...character has escaped him. All his pilgrims are severally <listinguished from each other ; and not only in their inclinations, but in their very physiognomies...
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Bentley's Miscellany, Volume 39

Charles Dickens, William Harrison Ainsworth, Albert Smith - Literature - 1856
...glorious John noted|| how clearly all the pilgrims are severally distinguished from each oilier — not only in their inclinations, but in their very physiognomies and persons,^ insomuch that "Baptista Porta could not have * " Euphranor." t " Vision of Poets." J Prologue to the...
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Bentley's Miscellany, Volume 39

Charles Dickens, William Harrison Ainsworth, Albert Smith - Literature - 1856
...glorious John noted]] how clearly all the pilgrims are severally distinguished from each other — not only in their inclinations, but in their very physiognomies and persons,^ insomuch that " Baptista Porta could not have * " Euphranor." f " Vision of Poets." t Prologue to the...
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A class-book of English prose, with biogr. notices, explanatory notes and ...

Robert Demaus - 1859
...him, he has taken into the compass of his " Canterbury Tales " the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation in his...and, not only in their inclinations, but in their physiognomies and persons. Baptista Porta2 could not have described their natures better than by the...
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The Works of John Dryden: In Verse and Prose, Volume 1

John Dryden - 1859
...of him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterhury tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his...from each other ; and not only in their inclinations, hut in their very physiognomies and persons. Baplista Porta could not have deserihed their natures...
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The Cornhill Magazine

William Makepeace Thackeray - Electronic journals - 1900
...of him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his...inclinations, but in their very physiognomies and persons. The matter and manner of their tales and of their telling are so suited to their different educations,...
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The Prose and Prose Writers of Britain from Chaucer to Ruskin: With ...

Robert Demaus - English literature - 1860 - 552 pages
...him, he has taken into the compass of his " Canterbury Tales " the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation in his...and, not only in their inclinations, but in their physiognomies and persons. Baptista Porta2 could not have described their natures better than by the...
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A Specimen of Chaucer's Language with Explanatory Notes

Lars Edman - English language - 1861 - 83 pages
...of him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours, as we now call them' of the whole English nation in his...distinguished from each other, and not only in their very physiognomies and persons. Baptista Porta/?) could not have described their natures better than...
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The Literature of Society, Volume 1

Mrs. A. T. Thomson - Authors, English - 1862
...with many imperfections, the result was admirable in its way. ' All his pilgrims,' Dryden remarks, ' are severally distinguished from each other, and not...the marks which the poet gives them. The matter and manner of their tales and of their telling are so suited to their different educations, humours, and...
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