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" He must have been a man of a most wonderful comprehensive nature, because, as it has been truly observed of him, he has taken into the compass Of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in... "
Blackwood's Magazine - Page 630
1845
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The Poetical Works of John Dryden: Containing Original Poems, Tales, and ...

John Dryden - 1867 - 445 pages
...be has taken into the compass of his Canterbury tales the various manners and humours (as we now ojl nal. M0 The first so binds the will, that things foreknown By spontaneity, not choice, are hii pilgrims are severally distinguished from each other ; and not only in their inclinations, but...
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The Poetical Works of John Dryden

John Dryden - English poetry - 1897 - 662 pages
...Tales " the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his nge. Not a single character has escaped him. All his pilgrims...inclinations, but in their very physiognomies and persons, liaptista Portat could not have described their natures better than by the marks which the poet gives...
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The poetical works of John Dryden, ed. by C.C. Clarke

John Dryden - 1874
...of him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his...the marks which the poet gives them. The matter and manner of their tales, and of their telling, are so suited to their different educations, humours,...
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The handbook of specimens of English literature, selected by J. Angus

Joseph Angus - 1880
...him, he has taken into the compass of his ' Canterbury Tales ' the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation in his...and, not only in their inclinations, but in their physiognomies and persons. Baptista Portab could not have described their natures better than by the...
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The Works of John Dryden: Poetical works

John Dryden, Walter Scott - English literature - 1885
...him, he has taken into the compass of his " Canterbury Tales " the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his...age. Not a single character has escaped him. All his pil* Dr. James Drake wrote, in answer to Collier, a work called "The Ancient and Modern Stage Surveyed,...
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The Works of Alexander Pope, Volume 1

Alexander Pope - Poets, English - 1871
...him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales the various manners, and humours, as we now call them, of the whole English nation in his...inclinations, but in their very physiognomies and persons. I see them as perfectly before me, — their humours, their features, and their very dress — as distinctly...
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Selections in English Prose from Elizabeth to Victoria (1580-1880).

James Mercer Garnett - English literature - 1890 - 701 pages
...him, he has taken into the compass of his " Canterbury Tales " the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation in his...in their very physiognomies and persons. Baptista Porta44 could not have described their natures better than by the marks which the poet gives them....
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The Uncollected Writings of Thomas De Quincey, Volume 1

Thomas De Quincey - 1890
...genius, as having ' taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales, the various manners and humours of the whole English nation in his age; not a single character has escaped him.' And this critic then proceeds thus—'The matter and manner of these tales, and of their telling, are...
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The Collected Writings of Thomas De Quincey, Volume 10

Thomas De Quincey - Authors, English - 1890
...genius, as having " taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours of the whole English nation in his age : not a single character has escaped him." And this critic then proceeds thus : — " The matter and manner of " these tales, and of their telling,...
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The Poetical Works of John Dryden, Volume 3

John Dryden - 1891
...his_age.. Not a_aicúle character has^ escapúd__Jiinr All his pilgrims areseverally disiinguishecTfrom each other ; and not only in their inclinations, but...the marks which the poet gives them. The matter and manner of their tales, and of their telling, are so suited to their different educations, humours,...
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