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" He must have been a man of a most wonderful comprehensive nature, because, as it has been truly observed of him, he has taken into the compass Of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in... "
Blackwood's Magazine - Page 630
1845
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Selections in English Prose from Elizabeth to Victoria (1580-1880).

James Mercer Garnett - English literature - 1891 - 701 pages
...him, he has taken into the compass of his " Canterbury Tales " the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation in his...each other ; and not only in their inclinations, but ih their very physiognomies and persons. Baptista Porta*1 could not have described their natures better...
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The Poetical Works of John Dryden: Edited with a Memoir, Revised Text, and Notes

John Dryden, William Dougal Christie - 1893 - 662 pages
...; and not only in their inclinations, but in their very physiognomies and persons. Baptista Porta t could not have described their natures better than...the marks which the poet gives them. The matter and manner of their tales and of their telling are so suited to their different educations, humours and...
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English Prose: Selections, Volume 3

Sir Henry Craik - English prose literature - 1894
...of him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his...the marks which the poet gives them. The matter and manner of their tales, and of their telling, are so suited to their different education, humours, and...
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English Prose, Volume 3

Sir Henry Craik - English prose literature - 1894
...of him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his...the marks which the poet gives them. The matter and manner of their tales, and of their telling, are so suited to their different education, humours, and...
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English Prose: Selections : with Critical Introductions by Various ..., Volume 3

Sir Henry Craik - English prose literature - 1894
...of him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his...the marks which the poet gives them. The matter and manner of their tales, and of their telling, are so suited to their different education, humours, and...
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English Literary Criticism

Charles Edwyn Vaughan - Criticism - 1896 - 219 pages
...of him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his...the marks which the poet gives them. The matter and manner of their tales, and of their telling, are so suited to their different educations, humours,...
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English Literary Criticism

Charles Edwyn Vaughan - Criticism - 1896 - 219 pages
...of him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his...very physiognomies and persons. Baptista Porta could riot have described their natures better than by the marks which the poet gives them. The matter and...
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A School History of English Literature, Volume 1

Elizabeth Lee - English literature - 1896 - 206 pages
...Chaucer has taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales, the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation in his...pilgrims are severally distinguished from each other ; not only in their inclinations, but in their very physiognomies and persons. The matter and manner...
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Dryden's Palamon and Arcite

John Dryden - Readers - 1897 - 105 pages
...of him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his...their very physiognomies and persons. Baptista Porta 1 could not have described their natures better than by the marks which the poet gives them. The matter...
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Dryden's Palamon and Arcite

John Dryden - 1897 - 111 pages
...of him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his...their very physiognomies and persons. Baptista Porta J could not have described their natures better than by the marks which the poet gives them. The matter...
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