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" He must have been a man of a most wonderful comprehensive nature, because, as it has been truly observed of him, he has taken into the compass Of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in... "
Blackwood's Magazine - Page 630
1845
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Palamon and Arcite

John Dryden - 1897 - 111 pages
...other; and not only in their inclinations, but in their very physiognomies and persons. Baptista Porta 1 could not have described their natures better, than...the marks which the poet gives them. The matter and manner of their tales, and of their telling, are so suited to their different educations, humors, and...
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The Collected Writings of Thomas De Quincey, Volume 10

Thomas De Quincey, David Masson - 1897
...genius, as having " taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours of the whole English nation in his age : not a single character has escaped him." And this critic then proceeds thus : — " The matter and manner of " these tales, and of their telling,...
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Dryden's Palamon and Arcite

John Dryden - Readers - 1898 - 105 pages
...of him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his...the marks which the poet gives them. The matter and manner of their tales and of their telling are so suited to their different educations, humours, and...
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Palamon and Arcite

John Dryden - 1898 - 149 pages
...of him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his...the marks which the poet gives them. The matter and manner of their tales, and of their telling, are so suited to their different educations, humours,...
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Dryden's Palamon and Arcite

John Dryden - 1898 - 149 pages
...Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in bis age. Not a single character has escaped him. All his...the marks which the poet gives them. The matter and manner of their tales, and of their telling, are so suited to their different educations, humours,...
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Palamon and Arcite

John Dryden - 1898 - 111 pages
...him, he has taken into the compass of his ' Canterbury Tales ' the various manners and humors (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his...in their very physiognomies and persons. Baptista Porta1 could not have described their natures better, than by the marks which the poet gives them....
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Palamon and Arcite

John Dryden - 1898 - 83 pages
...him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours 2 (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his...inclinations, but in their very physiognomies and persons. The matter and manner of their tales, and of their telling, are so suited to their different educations,...
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Dryden's Palamon and Arcite: Or, The Knight's Tale from Chaucer

John Dryden - English poetry - 1899 - 165 pages
...him, he has takeii into the compass of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his...the marks which the poet gives them. The matter and manner of their tales and of their telling are so suited to their different educations, humours, and...
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Conferences on Books and Men

Henry Charles Beeching - English essays - 1900 - 299 pages
...of him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his...inclinations, but in their very physiognomies and persons. The matter and manner of their tales and of their telling are so suited to their different educations,...
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A Little Book of English Prose

Annie Barnett - English prose literature - 1900 - 335 pages
...of him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation in his...inclinations, but in their very physiognomies and persons. The matter and manner of their tales and of their telling are so suited to their different education,...
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