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Books Books 51 - 60 of 173 on Judges ought to be more learned than witty ; more reverend than plausible ; and more....
" Judges ought to be more learned than witty ; more reverend than plausible ; and more advised than confident. Above all things, integrity is their portion and proper virtue. "
Bacon's essays, with annotations by R. Whately - Page 582
edited by - 1864
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Bacon's Essays

Francis Bacon - English essays - 1861 - 586 pages
...under pretext of exposition of Scripture, doth not stick1 to add and alter, and to pronounce that which they do not find, and by show of antiquity to introduce...(saith the law) is he that removeth the landmark." The mislay er of a mere stone is to blame ; but it is the unjust judge that is the capital remover of landmarks,...
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Bacon, His Writings and His Philosophy

George Lillie Craik - 1862 - 715 pages
...alter, and to pronounce that which they do not find ; and by show of antiquity to introduce uovelty. Judges ought to be more learned than witty, more reverend...integrity is their portion and proper virtue ; 'Cursed' tsaith the law) 'is he that removeth the landmark.' The mislayer of a mere stone is to hlame, but it...
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Literary and professional works

Robert Leslie Ellis - 1864
...Scripture doth not stick to add and alter ; and to pronounce that which they do not find ; and by shew of antiquity to introduce novelty. Judges ought to...is he that removeth the landmark. The mislayer of a mere-stone is to blame. But it is the unjust judge that is the capital remover of landmarks, when he...
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English literature and composition

Robert Demaus - 1866
...business.' ' Virtue was never so beholding to human nature, as it received his due at the second hand.' ' Judges ought to be more learned than witty, more reverend...than plausible, and more advised than confident.' ' As for conflagrations and great droughts, they do not merely dissipate and destroy.' ' There appear...
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Lord Bacon's Essays: With a Sketch of His Life and Character, Reviews of His ...

Francis Bacon - English essays - 1867 - 426 pages
...under pretext of exposition of scripture, doth not stick to add and alter ; and to pronounce that which they do not find, and by show of antiquity to introduce novelty. [2] Judges ought to be more learned than witty, more reverend than plausible, and more advised than...
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Bacon's Essays

Francis Bacon - Conduct of life - 1868 - 641 pages
...under pretext of exposition of Scripture, doth not stick' to add and alter, and to pronounce that which they do not find, and by show of antiquity to introduce...(saith the law) is he that removeth the landmark." The mislay er of a mere stone is to blame ; but it is the unjust judge that is the capital remover of landmarks,...
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BACON'S ESSAYS WITH ANNOTATIONS

RICHARD WHATELY - 1868
...under pretext of exposition of Scripture, doth not stick1 to add and alter, and to pronounce that which they do not find, and by show of antiquity to introduce...virtue. ' Cursed (saith the law) is he that removeth the landmark.'2 The mislay er of a mere stone is to blame ; but it is the unjust judge that is the capital...
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Albany Law Journal, Volume 11

Law - 1875
...for the eastern judicial circuit of Georgia. Judge Neilson is said to satisfy the Baconian test, that judges ought to be more learned than witty; more reverend than plausible; more advised than confident; and that, above all things, integrity is their portion and proper virtue....
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The Lakeside Monthly, Volume 9

1873
...their office is jus dicere, and not jus dare — to interpret law, and not to make law or give law. Judges ought to be more learned than witty; more reverend than plausible; and more advised than confident. Patience and gravity of hearing is an essential part of justice; and an overspeaking judge is no well...
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De Laudibus Legum Angliae

Sir John Fortescue - Constitutional law - 1874 - 302 pages
...cutting oft' evidence or counsel too short, or to prevent information by questions, although pertinent. Judges ought to be more learned than witty, more reverend than plausible, more advised than confident. Above all things, integrity is their portion and proper virtue." In a...
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