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Books Books 81 - 90 of 99 on Judges ought to be more learned than witty ; more reverend than plausible ; and more....
" Judges ought to be more learned than witty ; more reverend than plausible ; and more advised than confident. Above all things, integrity is their portion and proper virtue. "
Bacon's essays, with annotations by R. Whately - Page 582
edited by - 1864
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The Cyclopędia of Practical Quotations: English and Latin, with an Appendix ...

Jehiel Keeler Hoyt - Quotations, English - 1882 - 899 pages
...Thoughts. Night УТЛ. Li Line 835. JUDGES. Judges ought to be more learned than witty; more reverent than plausible, and more advised than confident: Above...things, integrity is their portion and proper virtue. c. BACON— Essay. Qf Judicature. Make not thyself the judge of any man. d. LONGFELLOW— Mask of Pandora....
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The Wit and Wisdom of the Bench and Bar

Frederick Charles Moncreiff - Judges - 1882 - 192 pages
...he had in his mind the example of Sir Edward Coke, whom he cordially detested. A judge should surely be " more learned than witty, more reverend than plausible, and more advised than confident;" but he will not be popular unless he is worthy of his reputation. The. judicial office cannot be invested...
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Essays

Francis Bacon - 1883 - 217 pages
...under pretext of exposition of Scripture, doth not stick to add and alter, and to pronounce that which they do not find, and by show of antiquity to introduce...integrity is their portion and proper virtue. "Cursed (with the lawH") is he that removeth the landmark." The mislayer of a mere stone is to blame; but it...
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The essays of lord Bacon, including his moral and historical works, with ...

Francis Bacon (visct. St. Albans.) - 1884
...under pretext of exposition of Scripture, doth not stick to add and alter, and to pronounce that which they do not find, and by show of antiquity to introduce...plausible, and more advised than confident. Above all 1 Lycurgus, Spartan law-giver, nine centuries before Christ. Solon, law-giver of Athens, Bc 594. Justinian,...
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Ten thousand a-year [by S. Warren]. By S. Warren

Samuel Warren - 1884
...gravity of bearing, are an essential part of justice ; and an over-speaking judge is no welltimed cymbal. Judges ought to be more learned than witty ; more...than plausible ; and more advised than confident. It is no grace to a judge first to find that which he might have heard in due time from the bar ; or...
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Bacon's Essays and Wisdom of the Ancients

Francis Bacon - English essays - 1884 - 425 pages
...under pretext of exposition of Scripture, doth not stick to add and alter, and to pronounce that which they do not find, and, by show of antiquity, to introduce novelty. Judges ought to 1 " Leaders in war." 2 Proportion, dimensions. * " Equal to their duties." " " To expound the law."...
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Bacon's Essays and Wisdom of the Ancients

Francis Bacon - English essays - 1884 - 425 pages
...under pretext of exposition of Scripture, doth not stick to add and alter, and to pronounce that which they do not find, and, by show of antiquity, to introduce novelty. Judges ought to 1 " Leaders in war." 2 Proportion, dimensions. * " Equal to their duties." * " To expound the law."...
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Report of the Louisiana State Bar Association, Volume 23

Agency (Law) - 1922
...their office is jus dicere, and not jus dare; to interpret law, and not to make law, or give law. * * * Judges ought to be more learned than witty, more reverend...things, integrity is their portion and proper virtue." (Bacon's Essay on Judicature.) There is an old-fashioned feeling — perhaps it is a prejudice —...
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The Harvard Classics, Volume 3

Charles William Eliot - Literature - 1909
...under pretext of exposition of Scripture doth not stick to add and alter; and to pronounce that which they do not find; and by show of antiquity to introduce...is he that removeth the landmark. The mislayer of a mere-stone1 is to blame. But it is the unjust judge that is the capital remover of landmarks, when...
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The Irish Law Times and Solicitors' Journal, Volume 35

Law - 1901
...under pretext of exposition of Scripture, doth not stick to add and alter, and to pronounce that which they do not find, and by show of antiquity to Introduce...and proper virtue. Cursed (saith the law) is he that remontli t/ie landmark. -The mislayer of a mere stone is to blame; but it is the unjust judge that...
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