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Books Books 11 - 20 of 189 on Judges ought to be more learned than witty ; more reverend than plausible ; and more....
" Judges ought to be more learned than witty ; more reverend than plausible ; and more advised than confident. Above all things, integrity is their portion and proper virtue. "
Bacon's essays, with annotations by R. Whately - Page 582
edited by - 1864
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Essays, Moral, Economical and Political

Francis Bacon - English essays - 1822 - 208 pages
...exposition of scripture, doth not stick to add and alter; and to pronounce that which they do not rind, and by show of antiquity to introduce novelty. Judges...(saith the law) is he that removeth the landmark." The raislayer of a mere stone is to blame ; but it is the unjust judge that is the capital remover of landmarks,...
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The Works of Francis Bacon: Baron of Verulam, Viscount St. Albans ..., Volume 2

Francis Bacon - English literature - 1824
...Scripture, doth not stick to add and alter; and to pronounce that which they do not find; and by shew of antiquity to introduce novelty. Judges ought to...portion and proper virtue. Cursed, saith the law, is he thatremoveth the land-mark. The mislayerof a merestone is to blame : but it is the unjust judge that...
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The Works of Francis Bacon: Lord Chancellor of England

Francis Bacon - 1834
...so the ornaments of power never look so splendid as when they are surrounded by a glory of virtue. Above all things, integrity is their portion and proper...the law, " is he that removeth the landmark." The raislayer of a mere-stone is to blame; but it is the unjust judge that is the capital remover of landmarks,...
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Fortescue de laudibus legum AngliŠ, the tr. [by F. Gregor] publ. 1775, and ...

sir John Fortescue - 1825
...cutting off evidence or counsel too short, or to prevent information by questions, although pertinent. Judges ought to be more learned than witty, more reverend than plausible, more advised than confident. Above all things, integrity is their portion and proper virtue." In a...
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The American Jurist and Law Magazine, Volume 14

Law - 1836
...discourse; but to weigh. and consider." And he followed another suggestion of that great man, that "Judges ought to be more learned, than witty ; more...than plausible; and more advised, than confident." The original bias, as well as choice, of his mind was to general principles, and comprehensive views,...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England: A New Edition:

Francis Bacon, Basil Montagu - 1834
...so the ornaments of power never look so splendid as when they are surrounded by a glory of virtue. Above all things, integrity is their portion and proper...he that removeth the landmark." The mislayer of a mere-stone is to blame; but it is the unjust judge that is the capital remover of landmarks, when he...
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Blackwood's Magazine, Volume 35

1834
...of misleading him. We never see him but the picture sketched by Lord Bacon is brought before us. " Judges ought to be more learned than witty, more reverend than plausible, and more advised than confident. Patience and gravity of bearing are an essential part of justice ; and AN OVERSl'EAKINU JUDGE íS ПО...
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The rule of life: or a collection of select moral sentences ...

Watson Adams - Conduct of life - 1834 - 264 pages
...safe, but he that is honest Sir W. Raleigh. Judges ought to be more learned than witty, more reverent than plausible, and more advised than confident. Above...things, integrity is their portion and proper virtue. Lord Bacon. The defending of a bad cause, is worse than the cause itself. The greatest of all injustice...
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The Works of Lord Bacon: With an Introductory Essay, Volume 1

Francis Bacon - Aphorisms and apothegms - 1838 - 832 pages
...under pretext of exposition of Scripture, doth not stick to add and alter ; and to pronounce that which they do not find ; and by show of antiquity to introduce...he that removeth the land-mark." The mislayer of a mere-stone is to blame : but it is the unjust judge that is the capital remover of land-marks, when...
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A discourse on the life and character of the Reverend John Thornton Kirkland ...

Alexander Young - Biography & Autobiography - 1838 - 104 pages
...discourse ; but to 69 weigh and consider." And he followed another suggestion of that great man, that "Judges ought to be more learned, than witty ; more...than plausible ; and more advised, than confident." The original bias, as well as choice, of his mind was to general principles, and comprehensive views,...
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