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" The Prince of Cumberland! that is a step On which I must fall down, or else o'erleap, For in my way it lies. Stars, hide your fires; Let not light see my black and deep desires: The eye wink at the hand; yet let that be Which the eye fears, when it is... "
The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text of the ... - Page 211
by William Shakespeare - 1803
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The British Theatre: Or, A Collection of Plays, which are Acted at ..., Volume 5

Mrs. Inchbald - English drama - 1824
...harbinger, and make joyful The hearing of my wife with your approach ; So, humbly take my leave. King. My worthy Cawdor ! Macb. The Prince of Cumberland...Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see. [Exit MACBETH. King. True, worthy Banquo ; he is full so valiant : And in his commendations L am fed; It...
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The Dramatic Works of Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - 1824 - 830 pages
...Thatisastep, On which I must fall down, or else o'erlcap ; [.iside. For in my way it lies. Stars, hideyonr it was, — for other means was none. — The sailors...wife, more careful for the latter-born, Had fastcn'd led ; It is a banquet to me. Let us after him, Whose care is gone before to bid us welcome ! [tis a...
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The Phrenological Journal and Miscellany, Volume 1

Phrenology - 1824
...the crown : The Prince of Cumberland ! That is a step On which I must fall down, or else o'erleap, For in my way it lies. Stars, hide your fires ! Let...be, Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see. Here it is evident he is now becoming more familiar with the thoughts of murder. Dcstructiveneas, secretiveness,...
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The Plays, Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1824
...is &t step, On which I must fall down, or else o'erleap, [Aside. For in my way it lies. Stars, hides your fires ! Let not light see my black and deep desires...when it is done, to see. [Exit. Dun. True, worthy Banqno ; he is full so valiant * ; And in his commendations I am fed ; It is a banquet to me. Let us...
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The Life of Shakespeare: Enquiries Into the Originality of His ..., Volume 2

Augustine Skottowe - Dramatists, English - 1824
...the use of nature ?" Similar bloody purposes were suggested to his mind on Malcolm's elevation, — " Stars, hide your fires ! Let not light see my black...be, Which the eye fears, when it is done to see." The prophecy relative to Banquo and his issue must also be viewed as a stratagem to inspire Macbeth...
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The life of Shakspeare; enquiries into the originality of his dramatic plots ...

Augustine Skottowe - 1824
...the use of nature ?" Similar bloody purposes were suggested to his mind on Malcolm's elevation, — " Stars, hide your fires ! Let not light see my black...be, Which the eye fears, when it is done to see." The prophecy relative to Banquo and his issue must also be viewed as a stratagem to inspire Macbeth...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: Winter's tale. Comedy of errors ...

William Shakespeare - 1826
...harbinger, and make joyful The hearing of my wife with your approach ; So, humbly take my leave. Dim. My worthy Cawdor ! Macb. The prince of Cumberland...see. [Exit. Dun. True, worthy Banquo ; he is full so valiant9; And in his commendations I am fed ; It is a banquet to me. Let us after him, Whose care is...
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare, with notes original and selected ...

William Shakespeare - 1843
...your approach; So, humbly take my leave. Dun. My worthy Cawdor! Macb. The prince of Cumberland!—That is a step, On which I must fall down, or else o'erleap,...[Exit. Dun. True, worthy Banquo; he is full so valiant 9 ; And in his commendations I am fed; It is a banquet to me. Let us after him, Whose care is gone...
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Winter's tale. Comedy of errors. Macbeth. King John

William Shakespeare - 1826
...So, humbly take my leave. Dun. My worthy Cawdor ! Macb. The prince of Cumberland ! — That is astep, On which I must fall down, or else o'erleap, [Aside....see. [Exit. Dun. True, worthy Banquo ; he is full so valiant9; And in his commendations I am fed ; It is a banquet to me. Let us after him, Whose care is...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - 1827 - 791 pages
...The prince of Cumberland. —That is a Step, On which 1 must fall down, or else o'er-Ieap, [Arife. Ne I,ct us after him, Whose caie is gone before to bid us welcome : It is a peerless kinsman. [Flourish....
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