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" The Prince of Cumberland! that is a step On which I must fall down, or else o'erleap, For in my way it lies. Stars, hide your fires; Let not light see my black and deep desires: The eye wink at the hand; yet let that be Which the eye fears, when it is... "
The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text of the ... - Page 211
by William Shakespeare - 1803
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With a Life of the Poet, and ...

William Shakespeare - 1851
...approach; So, humbly take my leave. Dun. My worthy Cawdor! Macb. The prince of Cumberland ! — This is a step, On which I must fall down, or else o'erleap....be, Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see. \_K.i-lt. Dun. True, worthy Banquo ; he is full so valiant ; And in his commendations I am fed; It...
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The Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems of William Shakspere, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1851
...ealled upon to do 'everything whieh they ean do sofsly, as regards the love and honour we bear you. The eye wink at the hand ! yet let that be, Which...worthy Banquo : he is full so valiant ; And in his eommendations I am fed ; It is a banquet to me. Let 's after him, Whose eare is gone before to bid...
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Studies from the English poets

George Frederick Graham - English literature - 1852 - 519 pages
...harbinger, and make joyful The hearing of my wife with your approach ; So, humbly take my leave. Dan. My worthy Cawdor ! Macb. The prince of Cumberland...Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see. [Exit. Dan. True, worthy Banquo, he is full so valiant ' ; And in his commendations I am fed ; Tt is a banquet...
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The plays of Shakspere, carefully revised [by J.O.] with a ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1853
...hearing of my wife with your approach ; So, humbly take my leave. Dun. My worthy Cawdor ! МасЪ. The Prince of Cumberland ! That is a step On which...when it is done, to see. [Exit. Dun. True, worthy Ban quo ; he is full so valiant, And in his commendations I am fed ; It Ħea banquet to me. Let us...
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Shakespeare restored

William Shakespeare - 1853
...prince of Cumberland ! — That is a step, [Aside. On which I must fall down, or else o'er-leap, 320 For in my way it lies. Stars, hide your fires ! Let...[Exit. Dun. True, worthy Banquo ; he is full so valiant ; 325 And in his commendations I am fed ; It is a banquet to me. Let's after him, Whose care is gone...
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Aubrey Conyers, Or, The Lordship of Allerdale

Elizabeth M. Stewart - 1853 - 305 pages
...laying up for him a heavy account of future insult and wrong. CHAPTER XIII. " Stars, hide your fire Let not light see my black and deep desires, The eye...be Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see." MACBETR. THE bitter winds of the winter night careered wildly over the heath, and round the solitary...
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The Plays of William Shakspeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 3

William Shakespeare, George Steevens - 1854
...approach; So, humbly take my leave. Dun. My worthy Cawdor ! J\Iacb. The prince of Cumberland I — -That is a step, On which I must fall down, or else...wink at the hand ! yet let that be, Which the eye tears, when it is done, to see. ' [ Ex. Dun. True, worthy Banquo; he isfull so valiant;1 And in his...
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The dramatic works of William Shakspere, from the text of Johnson, Stevens ...

William Shakespeare - 1856
...Much. The prince of Cumberland ! — That is On which I must fall down, or else o'er-leap, [Aside. F&r cn, although ileepme under j cold stone. Thunder. MACBETH. Finger of birth-strangled babe, Dim. True, worthy Banquo ; he is full so vaAnd in his commendations I am fed: [liant;* Itre a banquet...
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The Plays & Poems of Shakespeare: Macbeth. King John. King Richard the second

William Shakespeare, Edmond Malone - 1857
...to Inverness, And bind us farther to you. Macb. The rest is labor, which is not used for you : I '11 be myself the harbinger, and make joyful The hearing...[Exit. Dun. True, worthy Banquo ; he is full so valiant ; l And in his commendations I am fed : It is a banquet to me. Let us after him, Whose care is gone...
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The Complete Works of Shakspeare, Revised from the Best ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1857
...to Inverness, And bind us further to you. Macb. The rest is labor which is not used for you: I '11 be myself the harbinger, and make joyful The hearing...it is done, to see. [Exit. Dun. True, worthy Banquo ; ho is full so valiant, And in his commendations I am fed ; It is a banquet to me. Let us after him,...
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