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" This guest of summer, The temple-haunting. martlet, does approve, By his lov'd mansionry, that the heaven's breath Smells wooingly here : no jutty, frieze, Buttress, nor coigne of vantage, but this bird Hath made his pendent bed, and procreant cradle... "
The Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems of William Shakspere - Page 243
by William Shakespeare - 1851
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Knight's Cabinet edition of the works of William Shakspere, Volume 9

William Shakespeare - 1843
...castle hath a pleasant seat ; the air Nimbly and sweetly recommends itself Unto our gentle senses. Ban. This guest of summer, The temple-haunting martlet,...breed and haunt, I have observ'd, The air is delicate. Enter LADY MACBETH. Dun. See, see ! our honour'd hostess ! The love that follows us sometime is our...
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The works of William Shakespeare, the text formed from an entirely ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1843
...castle hath a pleasant seat : the air Nimbly and sweetly recommends itself Unto our gentle senses. Ban. This guest of summer, The temple-haunting martlet,...pendent bed, and procreant cradle ; Where they most breedi9 and haunt, I have observ'd, The air is delicate. " Where they MOST breed — ] All the folios...
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The Works of William Shakspeare: The Text Formed from an Intirely ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1843
...castle hath a pleasant seat : the air Nimbly and sweetly recommends itself Unto our gentle senses. Ban. This guest of summer, The temple-haunting martlet,...pendent bed, and procreant cradle ; Where they most breedi0 and haunt, I have observ'd, The air is delicate. t0 Where they MOST breed — ] All the folios...
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The Works of Shakespere, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1843
...our gentle senses. Ban. This guest of summer, The temple-haunting martlet, does approve, By his loved mansionry, that the heaven's breath Smells wooingly...procreant cradle : Where they most breed and haunt, I have observed The air is delicate. Enter LADY MACBETH. Dun. See, see ! our honoured hostess ! The love that...
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Remarks on Mr. J. P. Collier's and Mr. C. Knight's editions of Shakespeare

Alexander Dyce - 1843 - 299 pages
...perceive from the arrangement of the words that " or" is a misprint for " are " ? SCENE 6.— C. p. 114. " no jutty, frieze. Buttress, nor coigne of vantage,...and haunt, I have observ'd, The air is delicate." " All the folios have ' must breed ;' and there the passage is thus pointed : — ' Where they must...
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare, with notes original and ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1843
...pleasant seat ' : the air Nimbly and sweetly recommends itself Unto our gentle senses. u SC. VI. Ban. This guest of summer, The temple-haunting martlet,...wooingly here : no jutty, frieze, Buttress, nor coigne of vantage2, but this bird Hath made his pendent bed, and procreant cradle: Where they most breed and...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare: Printed from the Text ..., Volume 5

William Shakespeare - 1843
...castle hath a pleasant seat : the air Nimbly and sweetly recommends itself Unto our gentle senses. Ban. This guest of summer, The temple-haunting martlet...mansionry , that the heaven's breath Smells wooingly here: nojutty, frieze, Buttress, nor coigne of vantage, but this bird Hath made his pendent bed , and procreant...
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The Living Age ..., Volume 101

1869
...called repose — the short dialogue between Duncan and Banquo as they approach Maebeth's castle : — " This guest of summer, The temple-haunting martlet,...that the heaven's breath Smells wooingly here : no jutty./rieze, Buttress, nor coign of vantage, but this bird Hath made his pendent bed and procreaut...
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Chambers's Edinburgh Journal

1844
...gentle senses. Bart>[ito. This gueet of munmer. The temple-haunting martlet, doth approve, By his loved mansionry, that the heaven's breath Smells wooingly...Buttress, nor coigne of vantage, but this bird Hath made hi« pendent bed and procréant cradle : ЛУЪеге they most breed and haunt, I have observed, The...
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The Gentleman's Magazine

Early English newspapers - 1844
...and, like a witch in a sieve, you would think he were going to make merry with the devil." P. 74.— " No jutty, frieze, buttress, Nor coigne of vantage,...bird hath made His pendent bed and procreant cradle." See Ovid's Tristia, iii. 12, ver. 10— " Utque malse crimen matris deponat hit-undo Sub traTribui...
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