Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 51 - 60 of 186 on How long didst thou think that his silence was slumber ? When the wind waved his....
" How long didst thou think that his silence was slumber ? When the wind waved his garment, how oft didst thou start... "
The Eclectic review. vol. 1-New [8th] - Page 379
1807
Full view - About this book

Memoirs of a literary veteran: including sketches and anecdotes of ..., Volume 1

Robert Pearse Gillies - Authors - 1851
...affection. The following two lines of this poem are absolutely indelible on my remembrance : — " How long didst thou think that his silence was slumber ? When the wind waved his garment, how oft didst thou start ?" For intense feeling and sympathy, and for graphic truth, I...
Full view - About this book

Excursions and Adventures in New South Wales: With Pictures of ..., Volume 1

John Henderson (capt. 78th Highlanders.) - Natural history - 1851
...recalled to my mind those beautiful lines of Sir Walter Scott, written on a somewhat similar occasion: " How long didst thou think that his silence was slumber, When the wind waved his garments, how oft didst thou start, How many long days and long nights didst thou number, Ere he...
Full view - About this book

Select English poetry, with notes by E. Hughes

Edward Hughes - 1851
...; Like the corpse of an outcast abandoned to weather, Till the mountain-winds wasted the tenantless clay.' Nor yet quite deserted, though lonely extended ; For, faithful in death, his mute favourite attended, The much-loved remains of her master defended, And chased the hill-fox and the...
Full view - About this book

Memoirs of William Wordsworth, Volume 1

Christopher Wordsworth - 1851
...among his Ballads, p. 180. edit. 1806. The stanza referred to by Mr. Wordsworth is that beginning, " How long didst thou think that his silence was slumber ? When the wind waved his garment, how oft didst thou start ?" afterwards reported his account in print, was induced to question...
Full view - About this book

Memoirs of William Wordsworth, Poet-laureate, Volume 1

Christopher Wordsworth - 1851
...among his Ballads," p. 180. edit. 1806. The stanza referred to by Mr. Wordsworth is that beginning, " How long didst thou think that his silence was slumber ? When the wind waved his garment, how oft didst thou start ?" afterwards reported his account in print, was induced to question...
Full view - About this book

The juvenile reader, by N. Leitch

N. Leitch - 1851
...decay, Like the corpse of an outcast abandoned to weather, Till the mountain winds wasted the tenantless clay: Nor yet quite deserted, though lonely extended, For faithful in death, his dumb favourite attended, The much-loved .emains of her master defended, And chased the hill-fox and...
Full view - About this book

Dogs

H D. Richardson - 1851 - 3 pages
...faithful dog, almost reduced to a skeleton, still guarding them. In the words of Sir Walter Scott — " Nor yet quite deserted, though lonely extended, For faithful in death, his meek favourite attended, The much-loved remains of her master defended, And chased the hill-fox and...
Full view - About this book

The Dog

William YOUATT - 1852
...tenantless clay ; Nor yet quite deserted, though lonely extended, For, faithful in death, his mute favourite attended, The much-loved remains of her master defended,...that his silence was slumber ? When the wind waved his garments, how oft didst thou start ? How many long days and long weeks didst thou number Ere he...
Full view - About this book

Hausschatz englischer Poesie: Auswahl aus den Werken der bedeutendsten ...

Oskar Ludweg Beruhard Wolff - English poetry - 1852 - 399 pages
...— Like the corpse of an outcast abandon'd to weather, Till the mountain-winds wasted the tenantless clay. Nor yet quite deserted, though lonely extended, For, faithful in death, his mute favourite attended, The much-loved remains of her master defended, And chased the hill-fox and the...
Full view - About this book

The naturalist's poetical companion, with notes, selected by E. Wilson

Naturalist pseud, Edward WILSON (M.A., F.L.S.) - 1852
...Like the corpse of an outcast, abandon'd to weather, Till the mountain-winds wasted the tenantless clay ; Nor yet quite deserted, though lonely extended, For faithful in death, his mute favourite attended, The much-lov'd remains of his master defended, And chased the hill-fox and the...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF