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" He had by a misfortune common enough to young fellows, fallen into ill company, and amongst them, some that made a frequent practice of deer-stealing engaged him more than once in robbing a park that belonged to Sir Thomas Lucy, of Charlecote, near Stratford.... "
The plays of William Shakspeare, accurately pr. from the text of mr ... - Page xvi
by William Shakespeare - 1797
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The national encyclopędia. Libr. ed, Volume 11

National cyclopaedia - 1879
...February as ' Hamnet and Judeth.' The cause which drove him from Stratford is thus stated by Bowe: — 'He had, by a misfortune common enough to young fellows, fallen into ill company, and, amongst them, some that made a frequent practice of deer-stealing engaged him more than once in robbing...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - English drama - 1879
...extravagance that he was guilty of forced him out of his country and that way of living he had taken up He had by a misfortune common enough to young fellows, fallen into ill company, and amongst them some that made a frequent practice of deerstealing, engaged him more than once in robbing...
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The Complete Dramatic and Poetical Works of William Shakespeare ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1879 - 896 pages
...boyish sports and boon companions. " He had," says Rowe, one of the earliest of the biographers, 1709, "by a misfortune common enough to young fellows, fallen into ill company, and amongst them, some that made a frequent practice of deer-stealing engaged him more than once in robbing...
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Shakspere

Edward Dowden - 1882 - 167 pages
...Shakspere's departure from Stratford is thus told circumstantially by Rowe, his first biographer : " He had, by a misfortune common enough to young fellows, fallen into ill company ; and, amongst them, some that made a frequent practice of deer-stealing, engaged him, more than once, in...
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Shakespeare, from an American Point of View: Including an Inquiry as to His ...

George Wilkes - Religion in literature - 1882 - 471 pages
...prevented his being sufficiently scrupulous about the conduct and the character of his associates. 'He had, by a misfortune, common enough to young fellows, fallen into ill company,' says Rowe; and the excesses into which they seduced him were by no means consistent with that seriousness...
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The Works of Shakespeare: the Text Carefully Restored According to the First ...

William Shakespeare - English drama - 1883
...happily proved the occasion of exerting one of the greatest geniuses that ever was known in dramatic poetry. He had, by a misfortune common enough to young fellows, fallen into ill company ; and among them some, that made a frequent practice of deer-stealing, engaged him with them more than once'...
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The Works of Shakespeare ...

William Shakespeare - 1883
...happily proved the occasion of exerting one of the greatest geniuses that ever was known in dramatic poetry. He had, by a misfortune common enough to young fellows, fallen into fll company; and among them some, that made a frequent practice of deer-stealing, engaged him with...
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Dictionary of National Biography, Volume 51

Leslie Stephen, Sir Sidney Lee - Great Britain - 1897
...tradition, was the immediate cause of his long severance from his native place. ' Hehad,' wrote Howe, ' by a misfortune common enough to young fellows, fallen into ill company, and, among them, some, that made a frequent practice of deer-stealing, engaged him with them more than once...
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A Popular Manual of English Literature: Containing Outlines of the ...

Maude Gillette Phillips - English literature - 1885 - 1150 pages
...the most celebrated: " He had," says Rowe, whose account of the tale is the earliest handed down, " by a misfortune common enough to young fellows, fallen into ill company, and among them some that made a frequent practice of deer-stealing, engaged him more than once in robbing...
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Landmarks of English Literature

Henry James Nicoll - English literature - 1886 - 460 pages
...The immediate cause of his leaving Stratford is thus related by his first biographer, Rowe : — " He had, by a misfortune common enough to young fellows, fallen into ill company; and, amongst them, some that made a frequent practice of deer-stealing, engaged him more than once in robbing...
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