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" The Prince of Cumberland! that is a step On which I must fall down, or else o'erleap, For in my way it lies. Stars, hide your fires; Let not light see my black and deep desires: The eye wink at the hand; yet let that be Which the eye fears, when it is... "
Winter's tale. Comedy of errors. Macbeth. King John. Richard II. Henry IV, pt. 1 - Page 188
by William Shakespeare - 1836
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The Arden Dictionary of Shakespeare Quotations

Jane Armstrong - Drama - 1999 - 408 pages
...sweets we wish for turn to loathed sours Even in the moment that we call them ours. Lucrece 867-8 2 Stars, hide your fires! Let not light see my black...be, Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see. Macbeth 1.4.50-3, MACBETH 3 Nought's had, all's spent, Where our desire is got without content. Macbeth...
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The Arden Dictionary of Shakespeare Quotations

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1999 - 408 pages
...sweets we wish for turn to loathed sours Even in the moment that we call them ours. Lucrece 867-8 2 Stars, hide your fires! Let not light see my black...be, Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see. Macbeth 1.4.5o-3, MACBETH 3 Nought's had, all's spent, Where our desire is got without content. Macbeth...
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Shakespeare, Brecht, and the Intercultural Sign

Antony Tatlow - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 297 pages
...(I.iv.11). Yet Macbeth also wants to mask his desire not just from others but from himself as well: Stars, hide your fires, Let not light see my black...that be Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see. (I.iv.5o) As he gets deeper in, the figure of Macbeth becomes ever more the focus of contradictions...
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How Can I Get Through to You?: Reconnecting Men and Women

Terrence Real - Psychology - 2002 - 299 pages
...Macbeth usurper Macbeth prays for darkness; he knows he cannot bear to perform his crime while seeing it: "Stars, hide your fires! / Let not light see my black...be, / Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see." "Come, thick night," Lady Macbeth adds, "and pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell / That my keen...
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The Imperial Theme

G. Wilson Knight - Literary Collections - 2002 - 392 pages
...lights. But the evil that grips Macbeth must hide from such things of brilliance and universal beauty: Stars, hide your fires; Let not light see my black...be, Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see. (i. iv. 50) Throughout the evil in Macbeth is opposed to such order, to all family and national peace,...
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Shakespeare's Last Plays: Essays in Literature and Politics

Stephen W. Smith, Travis Curtright - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 244 pages
...to commit their crimes in darkness, so that they will not have to see what they are doing: Macbeth. Stars, hide your fires, Let not light see my black...that be Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see. (1.4.50-53); Lady Macbeth. Come, thick night. And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell, That my keen...
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Shakespeare's Tragic Skepticism

Millicent Bell - Drama - 2002 - 283 pages
...Separating consciousness from act, making invisible to himself even his own desires, Macbeth cries, Stars hide your fires, Let not light see my black...that be Which the eye fears when it is done to see. At the beginning, it is as though Shakespeare wants us to share, for as long as we can, Macbeth's own...
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Shakespeare on the German Stage: Volume 1, 1586-1914, Volume 1

Simon Williams - Drama - 2004 - 260 pages
...the furtiveness of his thoughts and communicate his confusion at exactly what it is he wishes to do: Stars, hide your fires! Let not light see my black...that be Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see. (1:4, 50-3) 35 Ian Findlay, The Porter's Scene in Schiller's Macbeth', Modern Language Notes, 88 (1973),...
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Shakespeare

George Ian Duthie - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 206 pages
...commit the murder: The Prince of Cumberland! that is a step On which I must fall down, or else o'erleap, For in my way it lies. Stars, hide your fires; Let...be, Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see. (I, iv, 48-53) Professor Dover Wilson's theory of a cut scene fits in well with this motif of Macbeth...
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Charting Shakespearean Waters: Text and Theatre

Sos Haugaard - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 164 pages
...Macbeth now self-consciously enters the realm of darkness, making there a space for himself alone: Stars, hide your fires, Let not light see my black...that be Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see. (1.4. 50-53) The stars will indeed not be shining on the night of the killing. By contrast, King Duncan,...
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