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" Cover your heads, and mock not flesh and blood With solemn reverence : throw away respect, Tradition, form, and ceremonious duty, For you have but mistook me all this while: I live with bread like you, feel want, Taste grief, need friends: subjected thus,... "
The Oxford and Cambridge review - Page 274
1846
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William Shakespeare, Richard II

Martin Coyle - Drama - 1999 - 192 pages
...Keeps death his Court, and there the Antique sits, Scoffing his State, and grinning at his Pomp! . . . Cover your heads and mock not flesh and blood, With solemn reverence; throw away Respect, Obeysance, Form and Ceremonious Duty, For you have but mistook me all this while, I live with bread...
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New Sites for Shakespeare: Theatre, the Audience, and Asia

John Russell Brown - Drama - 1999 - 211 pages
...theatre, Shakespeare has made him touch on the simplest needs and feelings that belong to everyone: I live with bread like you, feel want, Taste grief, need friends. (III. ii. 175-6) The same appeal is made no less confidently in the most gripping and highly wrought...
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Political Shakespeare

Stephen Orgel, Sean Keilen - Drama - 1999 - 326 pages
...audience's understanding and sympathy by enacting his subjection to Henry's power; and well may he ask, "Subjected thus, / How can you say to me I am a king?" (III. ii. 176-77l. "Subjected," he is no longer king. Richard will be Henry's subject — for at least...
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Shakespeare After Theory

David Scott Kastan, George M Bodman Professor of English David Scott Kastan - Drama - 1999 - 264 pages
...audience's understanding and sympathy by enacting his subjection to Henry's power; and well may he ask, "subjected thus, / how can you say to me I am a king?" (3.2.176-77). "Subjected," he is no longer king. Richard will be Henry's subject-for at least as long...
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Richard II

Andrew Worrall, John Seely - Great Britain - 2000 - 247 pages
...thus, Comes at the last, and with a little pin Bores through his castle wall, and farewell king! 170 Cover your heads, and mock not flesh and blood With...Subjected thus, How can you say to me, I am a king? BISHOP OF CARLISLE My lord, wise men ne'er sit and wail their woes, But presently prevent the ways...
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The Tragedy of King Richard the Second

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2000 - 113 pages
...168 Comes at the last, and with a little pin 169 Bores through his castle wall, and farewell king! no Cover your heads, and mock not flesh and blood With...feel want, taste grief, Need friends. Subjected thus, 176 How can you say to me I am a king? CARLISLE My lord, wise men ne'er sit and wail their woes, But...
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Shakespeare : A Life: A Life

Park Honan - Biography & Autobiography - 1998 - 480 pages
...comedy of Portia's and Nerissa's rings. 'I live', says the lethargic, selfpitying hero of Richard //, with bread, like you; feel want, Taste grief, need...Subjected thus, How can you say to me I am a king? (In. ii. 171-3) Shylock's humane protest is more powerful than that, as when he evokes the crucified...
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Shakespeare for My Father: A One-woman Play in Two Acts

Lynn Redgrave, William Shakespeare - Biographical drama - 2001 - 61 pages
...own but death, And that small model of the barren earth Which serves as paste and cover to our bones. For you have but mistook me all this while: I live...subjected thus, How can you say to me I am a king? (LYNN opens her eyes, very slowly moves toward the chair, her hand outstretched as if to touch her...
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Shakespeare's Political Realism: The English History Plays

Tim Spiekerman - Political Science - 2001 - 208 pages
...passages, where both Richard and Henry deny that a king is a being somehow superior to his subjects: Cover your heads, and mock not flesh and blood With...Tradition, form, and ceremonious duty; For you have mistook me all this while. I live with bread like you, feel want, Taste grief, need friends—. . ....
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Shakespeare: la invención de lo humano

Harold Bloom - Characters and characteristics in literature - 2001 - 734 pages
...thus, /Comes at the last, and with a little pin / Bored thorough his castle wall, and farewell king! / Cover your heads, and mock not flesh and blood / With...respect, / Tradition, form, and ceremonious duty; / For yon have but mistook me all this while. / I live with bread like yon, feel want, / Taste grief, need...
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