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" Cover your heads, and mock not flesh and blood With solemn reverence : throw away respect, Tradition, form, and ceremonious duty, For you have but mistook me all this while: I live with bread like you, feel want, Taste grief, need friends: subjected thus,... "
The Oxford and Cambridge review - Page 274
1846
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1999 Lectures and Memoirs

British Academy - Reference - 2000 - 574 pages
...what are friends for fear' (Richard III, 5. 2. 20); or of King Richard II's plaintive confession that 'I live with bread like you, feel want, /Taste grief, need friends' (3. 2. l75-6). In terms of the grammar with which I am concerned, the f1gure of the 'friend' is one...
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Shakespeare's Serial History Plays

Nicholas Grene, Professor of English Literature Nicholas Grene - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 278 pages
...sequence of changes for our understanding of the figure of Hal/Henry V CHAPTER EIGHT Change and identity Cover your heads, and mock not flesh and blood With...Subjected thus, How can you say to me I am a king? (3.2.17 1 7) At this stage of Richard II, there is still some high-horse attitudinising in Richard's...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 50

Stanley Wells - Drama - 2002 - 316 pages
...five senses and the affections that make them human, Richard invokes as well his need for friends: For you have but mistook me all this while. I live...subjected thus. How can you say to me, I am a king? (Richard II 3.2.174-7; italics added) The need for friends, which thus 'subjects' Richard, is precisely...
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William Shakespeare: The Complete Works

William Shakespeare - Literary Collections - 1989 - 1280 pages
...humour'd thus, Comes at the last, and with a little pin Bores through his castle- wall, and — farewell Cover your heads, and mock not flesh and blood With...duty; For you have but mistook me all this while: 1 live with bread like you, feel want, Taste grief, need friends: — subjected thus, How can you say...
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The Time is Out of Joint: Shakespeare as Philosopher of History

Agnes Heller - Fiction - 2002 - 375 pages
...crown / That rounds the mortal temples of the king / Keeps death his court. . . . farewell, king. / Cover your heads, and mock not flesh and blood / With...duty, / For you have but mistook me all this while" (3.2.156—70). Listen to the way in which the existential stage slowly emerges from behind the historical...
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The Sovereign Flower: On Shakespeare as the Poet of Royalism, Together with ...

G. Wilson Knight - Literary Collections - 2002 - 324 pages
...we call our own but death . . . (in. ii. 144) He now recognizes that he is, after all, only a man: 'I live with bread like you, feel want, taste grief, need friends' (in. ii. 175). But, as the clouds gather, he grows in stature after the fashion characteristic of all...
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Shakespeare nostro contemporaneo

Jan Kott - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 249 pages
...throw away respect, / Tradition, form, and ceremonious duty; / Por you bave but mistook me all the while: / I live with bread like you, feel want, / Taste grief, need friend: — subjected thus, / How can you say to me, I am a king?] "E pur si muove!" una frase...
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Players of Shakespeare 6: Essays in the Performance of Shakespeare's History ...

Royal Shakespeare Company - Biography & Autobiography - 2004 - 221 pages
...semidivine, just one of the boys. In words of one syllable, as so often in moments of emotion in Shakespeare, I live with bread, like you; feel want, Taste grief,...Subjected thus, How can you say to me I am a king? (mu175-7) 'Subjected ' is of course a pun, and a conscious one. Richard has a terrible capacity for...
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Handmade Culture: Raku Potters, Patrons, And Tea Practitioners In Japan

Morgan Pitelka - Art - 2005 - 236 pages
...its focus on a rich familial tradition that endures for many centuries, is a start. Handmade Culture Cover your heads and mock not flesh and blood With...subjected thus. How can you say to me, I am a king? — William Shakespeare, King Richard II Introduction In 1997 the fifteenth-generation head of the...
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Richard II

William Shakespeare, Paul Werstine - Performing Arts - 2011 - 352 pages
...thus, Comes at the last and with a little pin Bores through his castle wall, and farewell, king! 175 Cover your heads, and mock not flesh and blood With...this while. I live with bread like you, feel want, 180 Taste grief, need friends. Subjected thus, How can you say to me I am a king? CARLISLE My lord,...
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