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" Cover your heads, and mock not flesh and blood With solemn reverence : throw away respect, Tradition, form, and ceremonious duty, For you have but mistook me all this while: I live with bread like you, feel want, Taste grief, need friends: subjected thus,... "
The Oxford and Cambridge review - Page 274
1846
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Richard II

William Shakespeare, Paul Werstine - Performing Arts - 2011 - 352 pages
...thus, Comes at the last and with a little pin Bores through his castle wall, and farewell, king! 175 Cover your heads, and mock not flesh and blood With...this while. I live with bread like you, feel want, 180 Taste grief, need friends. Subjected thus, How can you say to me I am a king? CARLISLE My lord,...
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Shakespeare Adaptations from the Restoration: Five Plays

Barbara A. Murray - Drama - 2005 - 556 pages
...as a God; Then to the train fate's Engineer sets fire, Blows up his pageant Pride and farewell King. Cover your heads and mock not flesh and blood, With solemn reverence, throw away Respect, Obeysance, Form and Ceremonious Duty, For you have but mistook me all this while, 120 I live with bread...
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Shakespeare's Poetic Styles: Verse Into Drama

John Baxter - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 272 pages
...for attention as pieces of advice. He opens the third section of his speech with the following words: Cover your heads, and mock not flesh and blood With solemn reverence. The last two words call attention to themselves because, while Richard succeeds in dismissing reverence,...
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Shakespeare, Memory and Performance

Peter Holland - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 357 pages
...to say goes for everybody, it's enough to hear me, 'I am the universal sacrificial victim'21: . . . you have but mistook me all this while. I live with...Subjected thus, How can you say to me, I am a king? (Richard II, 3.2. 170-3) In short 'tis common, but then why seems it so particular with them? In the...
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Center Or Margin: Revisions of the English Renaissance in Honor of Leeds Barroll

John Leeds Barroll - Literary Collections - 2006 - 318 pages
...by the communal charismatic group experience. Compare Richard IPs notorious collapse into humanness: "I live with bread like you, feel want / Taste grief,...subjected thus / How can you say to me, I am a king?" (Richard II 3.2.175-77). No matter what he himself may intend, Richard's humanness means not a bond...
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Civilization in French and Francophone Literature

Buford Norman, James Day, James T. Day - History - 2006 - 219 pages
...sunshine day?" (5.1.26-27; [1995], 382; [1994], 67). Shakespeare amplifies the thought in Richard II, live with bread, like you; feel want, Taste grief,...Subjected thus, How can you say to me I am a king? (3.2.171-73) and following, Then treason makes me wish myself a beggar [...] And straight am nothing....
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Lectures - Shakespeare

Robert G. Ingersoll - Literary Collections - 2007 - 516 pages
...power is lost ; and so, of those who stood uncovered before him, he asks this piteous question : " I live with bread, like you ; feel want, Taste grief,...subjected thus, How can you say to me I am a king ? " Think of the salutation of Antony to the dead Caesar : " Pardon me, thou piece of bleeding earth."...
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The Staging of Romance in Late Shakespeare: Text and Theatrical Technique

Christopher J. Cobb - Literary Criticism - 2007 - 304 pages
...dialogue then calls attention to Richard's bodily condition as no different from that of any other person: "I live with bread like you, feel want, / Taste grief,...subjected thus, how can you say to me I am a King?" ( 1 75-77) . Hotspur brings Tamburlainian language into 1 Henry IV, where it is admired but firmly...
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Shakespeare: A Life in Art

Russell A. Fraser - 1988
...deserts, but as he falls he glistens. This increment, modifying Shakespeare's given, makes a difference. I live with bread like you, feel want, Taste grief, need friends. Made less than his name, Shakespeare's hero becomes his grief, a version of Everyman but idiosyncratic,...
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The Cambridge Introduction to Shakespeare

Emma Smith - Literary Criticism - 2007
...humoured thus Comes in at the last and with a little pin Bores through his castle wall and farewell king! Cover your heads, and mock not flesh and blood With solemn reverence. (Richard II 3.2. 160-72) Richard's speech here works with an analogy between the human body, the role...
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