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Books Books 61 - 70 of 167 on I pray you, in your letters, When you shall these unlucky deeds relate, Speak of....
" I pray you, in your letters, When you shall these unlucky deeds relate, Speak of me as I am ; nothing extenuate, Nor set down aught in malice... "
Calcutta Monthly Journal and General Register ... - Page 70
1839
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The Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 4

William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens, Isaac Reed, William Hazlitt - 1852
...know it ; No more of that :— I pray you, in your letters, When you shall these unlucky deeds relate, Speak of me as I am ; nothing extenuate, Nor set down aught in malice : then must you speak Of one, that loved not wisely, but too well ; Of one, not easily jealous, but, being wrought, Perplex'd...
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Guy's new speaker, selections of poetry and prose from the best writers in ...

Joseph Guy - 1852
...'t ; No more of that : — I pray you, in your letters, When you shall these unlucky deeds relate, Speak of me as I am ; nothing extenuate, Nor set down aught in malice : then must you speak Of one, that loved not wisely, but too well ; Of one, not easily jealous, but, being wrought, Perplex'd...
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William Shakspeare's Complete Works, Dramatic and Poetic, Volume 2

William Shakespeare, George Steevens - 1852
...it ; No more of that : — I pray you, in your letters, When you shall these unlucky deeds relate, mbátante : Henceforth, I charge you, аз you love our favour, Quite to forget this quarre Of one, that lov'd not wisely, but too well ; Of one, not easily jealous, but, being wrought, Perplex'd...
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Shakspeare and his times

Guizot (François, M.), Achille-Léon-Victor Broglie (duc de) - Drama - 1852 - 360 pages
...know it ; No more of that. I pray you, in your letters, When you shall these unlucky deeds relate, Speak of me as I am ; nothing extenuate, Nor set down aught in malice ; then must you speak Of one that loved, not wisely, but too well : Of one not easily jealous ; bnt, being wrought, Perplex'd...
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Dramatic Works: From the Text of Johnson, Stevens and Reed; with ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1852
...know it; No more of that : — I pray you, in your letters, When you shall these unlucky deeds relate, Speak of me as I am ; nothing extenuate, Nor set down aught m malice : then must you speak Of one, that loved not wisely, but too well ; Of one, not easily jealous,...
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The plays of Shakspere, carefully revised [by J.O.] with a selection of engr ...

William Shakespeare - 1853
...it : No more of that : — I pray you, in your letters, When you shall these unlucky deeds relate, Of one that loved not wisely, but too well ; Of one not easily jealous, but, being wrought, Perplexed...
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My scrapes and escapes, or The adventures of a student

1853
...upon thy beauty .Í Soft you,! a word or two before you go. When you shall these unlucky deeds relate, Speak of me as I am — nothing extenuate, Nor set down aught in malice : then must you speak Of one not easily jealous, but whose hand, Like the base Indian, threw a pearl away Richer than all...
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The Freemasons' quarterly (magazine and) review [afterw.] The Freemasons ...

Freemasons' magazine - 1853 - 14 pages
...; and concluded his remarks by entreating the Brethren, in the language of the immortal bard, — " Speak of me as I am ; nothing extenuate, Nor set down aught in malice." Song, " The yellow-hair'd laddie," Miss Ransford. In proposing " The Visitors," the Prov....
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The Works of William Shakespeare: Comprising His Dramatic and ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare, George Steevens - 1853
...ofthat: — I pray you, in your letters, When you shall these unlucky deeds relate, Speak of me as 1 e Of one, that lov'd not wisely, but too well ; Of one, not easily jealous, out, bein" wrought, Perplex'd...
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Dictionary of Shakespearian Quotations: Exhibiting the Most Forcible ...

William Shakespeare - 1853 - 418 pages
...thou art blam'd, shall not be thy defect, Tor slander's mark was ever yet the fair. Poems. CANDOUR. Speak of me as I am ; nothing extenuate, Nor set down aught in malice. O. v. 3 In simple and pure soul I come to you. O. i. 1 CANNONADE (See also SIEGE). By east...
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