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" Those rights then which God and nature have established, and are therefore called natural rights, such as are life and liberty, need not the aid of human laws to be more effectually invested in every man than they are ; neither do they receive any additional... "
Commentaries on the Laws of England: In Four Books - Page 54
by Sir William Blackstone - 1791
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Blackstone Economized: Being a Compendium of the Laws of England to the ...

William Blackstone, David Mitchell Aird - Law - 1873 - 368 pages
...Legislature; for those rights which God and nature have established, called natural rights, such as life and liberty, need not the aid of human laws to be more effectually possessed by man. On the contrary, no human legislature has power to abridge or destroy them, unless...
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The Student's Blackstone: Being the Commentaries on the Laws of England of ...

William Blackstone - Law - 1877 - 608 pages
...legislator. Natural rights, such as life and liberty, need not human laws to be more effectually invested in every man than they are ; neither do they receive any additional strength when declared by law to be inviolable. On the other hand, no legislature has power to abridge or destroy them, unless...
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Proceedings of the Annual Session

American Association on Mental Deficiency - People with mental disabilities - 1877
...Those rights which God and nature have established, and are, therefore, called natural rights, such as are life and liberty, need not the aid of human laws to be more effectually invested in every man than they are, neither do they receive any additional strength when declared...
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The Student's Blackstone: Being the Commentaries on the Laws of England of ...

William Blackstone - Law - 1885 - 596 pages
...legislator. Natural rights, such as life and liberty, need not human laws to be more effectually invested in every man than they are ; neither do they receive any additional strength when declared by law to be inviolable. On the other hand, no legislature has power to abridge or destroy them, unless...
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The Writings of John Greenleaf Whittier: Anti-slavery poems: Songs of labor ...

John Greenleaf Whittier - 1889
...natural rights, such as life and liberty, need not the aid of human laws to be more effectually vested in every man than they are ; neither do they receive any additional strength when declared by municipal laws to be inviolable: on the contrary, no human legislation has power to abridge or destroy...
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The Writings: The conflict with slavery: Politics and reform; The inner life ...

John Greenleaf Whittier - 1889
...rights which God and Nature have established, and which are therefore called natural rights, such as life and liberty, need not the aid of human laws to be more effectually vested in every man than they are; neither do they receive any additional strength when declared by...
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The Writings of John Greenleaf Whittier: The conflict with slavery; politics ...

John Greenleaf Whittier - 1889
...rights which God and Nature have established, and which are therefore called natural rights, such as life and liberty, need not the aid of human laws to be more effectually vested in every man than they are ; neither do they receive any additional strength when declared by...
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The Writings of John Greenleaf Whittier in 7 V, Volume 7

John Greenleaf Whittier - 1889
...rights which God and Nature have established, and which are therefore called natural rights, such as life and liberty, need not the aid of human laws to be more effectually vested in every man than they are ; neither do they receive any additional strength when declared by...
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Commentaries on the Laws of England ...

William Blackstone - Law - 1890
...distinction is another strong reason for allowing the terms to fall into disuse. (23) Natural rights, such as life and liberty, need not the aid of human laws to be more effectually invested in every man than they are No human legislation has power to abridge or destroy them, etc.,...
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The Works of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7

John Greenleaf Whittier - 1892
...rights which God and Nature have established, and which are therefore called natural rights, such as life and liberty, need not the aid of human laws to be more effectually vested in every man than they are; neither do they receive any additional strength when declared by...
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