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" Could great men thunder As Jove himself does, Jove would ne'er be quiet, For every pelting, petty officer, Would use his heaven for thunder ; Nothing but thunder. Merciful heaven ! Thou rather with thy sharp and sulphurous bolt Split'st the unwedgeable... "
The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal - Page 434
1808
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The Plays of Shakespeare: The Text Regulated by the Old Copies, and by the ...

William Shakespeare - 1853 - 884 pages
...be quiet, For every pelting, petty officer Would use his heaven for thunder ; Nothing but thunder. rdinal, And from the great and new-made duke of Suffolk ; Yet I ; hut man, proud man ! Drest in a little brief authority, Most ignorant of what he's most assur'd,...
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School elocution : or The young academical orator

William Herbert - 1853 - 192 pages
...you're mov'd — No, not a whii, not a whii, — I do not think but she is honest, — Merciful heav'n ! Thou, rather ! with thy sharp and sulphurous bolt,...unwedgeable and gnarled oak, Than the soft myrtle : And thou, all shaking thunder, Strike flat the thick rotundity o' th' world! Crack natures' moulds...
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The family Shakespeare [expurgated by T. Bowdler]. in which those ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1853
...quiet, For every pelting,6 petty officer, Would use his heaven for thunder; nothing but thunder. — Merciful heaven ! Thou rather, with thy sharp and sulphurous bolt, Split'st the unwedgeable and gnarled7 oak, Than the soft myrtle ; — O, but man, proud man ! Brest in a little brief authority...
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The Works of Shakespeare: The Text Regulated by the Recently ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare, John Payne Collier - 1853
...ne'er be quiet, For every pelting, petty officer Would use his heaven for thunder: Nothing but thunder. Merciful heaven ! Thou rather with thy sharp and sulphurous bolt Split'st the unwedgcable and gnarled oak, Than the soft myrtle ; but man, proud man ! Brest in a little brief authority,...
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The Works of William Shakespeare: Comprising His Dramatic and ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1853
...be quiet, For every pelting1 petty officer, Would use his heaven for thunder; nothing but thunder. Merciful heaven ! Thou rather, with thy sharp and sulphurous bolt, Split'st the unwedgcable and gnarled1 oak. Than the soft mvrtle : — O, but man, proud man ! Drest in a little...
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Norđurfari: Or, Rambles in Iceland

Pliny Miles - Iceland - 1854 - 334 pages
...is over, it is often seen floating on the rain-water. To give one more quotation ; King Lear says: ' Merciful heaven, Thou rather, with thy sharp and sulphurous...unwedgeable and gnarled oak, Than the soft myrtle." To drive a thunderbolt to split the myrtle, the game would not be worth the powder, I suppose. Near...
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Norđurfari: Or, Rambles in Iceland

Pliny Miles - Iceland - 1854 - 252 pages
...it is often seen floating on the rain-water. To give one more quotation ; King Lear says — • " Merciful heaven, Thou rather, with thy sharp and sulphurous...unwedgeable and gnarled oak, Than the soft myrtle." To drive a thunderbolt to split the myrtle, the game would not be worth the powder, I suppose. Near...
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Shakespeare's Scholar: Being Historical and Critical Studies of His Text ...

Richard Grant White - 1854 - 504 pages
...be quiet; For every pelting, petty officer, Would use his heaven for thunder : nothing but thunder. Merciful heaven ! Thou rather, with thy sharp and sulphurous bolt, / Split'st the unwodgeable and gnarlud oak, Than the soft- myrtle : — But man, proud man 1 Drwt in a little brief...
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A Treatise on English Punctuation ...: With an Appendix, Containing Rules on ...

John Wilson - English language - 1855 - 334 pages
...left. Approach, And read (for thou canst read) the lay Graved on the stone beneath yon aged thorn. Thou rather, with thy sharp and sulphurous bolt, Splitst...unwedgeable and gnarled oak, Than the soft myrtle. A bearded man, Armed to the teeth art thou : one mailed hand Grasps the broad shield, and one the sword....
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The Complete Works of William Shakespeare: Comprising His Plays and Poems ...

William Shakespeare - 1855 - 986 pages
...be quiet, For every 'pelting, petty officer Would use his heaven for thunder ; Nothing but thunder. unwedgeablo and gnarled oak, Than the soft myrtle ; but man, proud man ! Drest in a little brief authority,...
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