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" Could great men thunder As Jove himself does, Jove would ne'er be quiet, For every pelting, petty officer, Would use his heaven for thunder ; Nothing but thunder. Merciful heaven ! Thou rather with thy sharp and sulphurous bolt Split'st the unwedgeable... "
The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal - Page 434
1808
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The dramatic works of William Shakespeare, with copious glossarial notes and ...

William Shakespeare - 1864
...•• \ For every pelting,1 petty officer, Would use his heaven for thunder ; nothing but thunder. — Merciful heaven ! Thou rather, with thy sharp and...unwedgeable and gnarled oak, Than the soft myrtle ; 0, but man, proud man ! Brest in a little brief authority ; Most ignorant of what he's most assur'd,...
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The Shakspearian Reader: A Collection of the Most Approved Plays of ...

William Shakespeare, John William Stanhope Hows - Readers - 1864 - 447 pages
...quiet. For every pelting, petty officer Would use his heaven for thunder : nothing but thunder.— Merciful heaven ! Thou rather, with thy sharp and...unwedgeable and gnarled oak, Than the soft myrtle ; — But man, proud man ! Drest in a little brief authority ; Most ignorant of what he's most assur'd,...
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Shaksperean gems, newly collected and arranged with a life of W. Shakspere ...

William Shakespeare - 1865
...strength; but it is tyrannous To use it like a giant. Could great men thunder SHAKSPEREAN GEMS. 49 Merciful Heaven, Thou rather, with thy sharp and sulphurous...Split'st the unwedgeable and gnarled oak Than the soft myrtle:—But man, proud man! Brest in a little brief authority ; Most ignorant of what he's most assured,...
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The Standard Fifth Reader for Public and Private Schools: Containing a ...

Epes Sargent - 1867 - 478 pages
...be quiet, For every pelting,11 petty officer Would use his heaven for thunder ; nothing but thunder. Merciful Heaven ! . Thou rather, with thy sharp and...unwedgeable and gnarled oak, Than the soft myrtle : — But man, proud man, Brest in a little brief authority, Most ignorant of what he's most assured,...
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A Dictionary of Quotations from the English Poets

Henry George Bohn - Quotations - 1867 - 715 pages
...truncheon, nor the judge's robe, Become them with one half so good a grace As Mercy. . Sh. M.for M. n. 2. Merciful heaven : Thou rather with thy sharp and sulphurous...unwedgeable and gnarled oak, Than the soft myrtle. 6'AMfor M. 1I. 2. How would you be, If He, which is at the top of judgment, should But judge you as...
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Hotch-pot, by Umbra

sir Charles Cavendish Clifford (4th bart.) - 1867
...but strikes to the ground lofty trees.' ' Ay,' again came in X., quoting the one author he knows : ' Thou rather with thy sharp and sulphurous bolt Split'st...unwedgeable and gnarled oak Than the soft myrtle. ' ' Well,' said I, ' substituting the wind for the thunderbolt, here we have an exact illustration...
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The Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1867 - 1075 pages
...petty officer Would use his heaven for thunder: Nothing but thunder ' Merciful Heaven, Thou rallier bjW]! Z ; O %: DM B / ` = Wn i eTryX ﲶ; m Ф w mzǻ B k ( 9P@ : bul man. proud man, U rest in a little brief authority. Most ignurant of what he's most assured,...
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A manual of English prosody

Robert Frederick Brewer - 1869
...be quiot, For every pelting, petty officer Would use his heaven for thunder ; Nothing but thunder ! Merciful Heaven, Thou rather with thy sharp and sulphurous...the unwedgeable and gnarled oak Than the soft myrtle : but man, proud man, Drest in a little brief authority, Most ignorant of what he 's most assured,...
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Evening hours, ed. by E.H. Bickersteth

Edward Henry Bickersteth (bp. of Exeter)
...be quiet, For erery pelting, petty officer Would use his heaven for thunder — nothing but thunder. Merciful heaven! Thou rather with thy sharp and sulphurous...unwedgeable and gnarled oak Than the soft myrtle. O but man, proud man ! Drest in a little brief authority, — Most ignorant of what he's most assured,...
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Virgil in English Rhythm: With Illustrations from the British Poets, from ...

Virgil - Agriculture - 1871 - 330 pages
...the breath, and bend up every spirit To his full height !" Shakespeare, A". Henry K. iii. 1. 658. " Merciful heaven ! Thou rather with thy sharp and sulphurous...unwedgeable and gnarled oak. Than the soft myrtle." Shakespeare, Measure for Measure, ii. 2. Pursues : he, searching, Turnus tracks alone In the thick...
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