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" Nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to their respective abodes, and took leave of them with a hearty smack at the door; which, as it was an established... "
Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Page 365
1820
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Select Academic Speaker: Containing a Large Number of New and Appropriate ...

Henry Coppée - Readers and speakers - 1867 - 546 pages
...noise and without confusion. They were carried home by their own carriages, that is to say, by the vehicles nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to their respective abodes, and took leave...
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Sanders' Rhetorical, Or, Union Sixth Reader: Embracing a Full Exposition of ...

Charles Walton Sanders - Readers - 1862 - 600 pages
...noise, and without confusion. They were carried home by their own carriages—that is to say, by the vehicles nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to their respective abodes, and took leave...
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National Fourth Reader: Containing a Simple, Comprehensive and Practical ...

Richard Green Parker - 1870
...noise and without confusion. They were carried home by their own carriages, that is to say, by the vehicles nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to their respective abodes, and took leave...
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KNICKERBOCKER'S NEW YORK

WASHINGTON IRVING - 1871
...the vehicles nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to...respective abodes, and took leave of them with a hearty emack at the door : which, as it was an established piece of etiquette, done in perfect simplicity...
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The First[-fifth] Reader ...

Edward Austin Sheldon - Readers - 1875
...without noise or confusion. The guests were carried home by their own carriages ; that is to say, by the vehicles nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. Washington Irving. XXXVI. — THE SABBATH. "THRESH glides the brook, and blows the gale, -*-...
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Burlesque

Richard Henry Stoddard - Wit and humor - 1875 - 224 pages
...and Jonah appeared most manfully bouncing out of the whale, like Harlequin through a barrel of fire. provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to their respective abodes, and took leave...
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Sanders' Rhetorical, Or, Union Sixth Reader: Embracing a Full Exposition of ...

Charles Walton Sanders - Readers - 1876 - 600 pages
...the vehicles nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to...leave of them with a hearty smack at the door; which, aa it was an established piece of etiquette, done in perfect simplicity and honesty of heart, occasioned...
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Chambers's Cyclopædia of English Literature: A History, Critical ..., Volume 2

Robert Chambers, Robert Carruthers - English literature - 1876
...noise and without confusion. They were carried home by their own carriages — that is to say, by the s wide : No uttered syllable, or, woe betide ! But to her heart her heart was voluble, Pai wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to their respective abodes, and took leave...
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A Graded Test Spelling-book: To which are Added Sentences for Analysis and ...

Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert - English language - 1877 - 104 pages
...future frightens. LESSON XXVI. 1. They were carried home by their own carriages, that is to say, by the vehicles nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. — Irving. 2. They adopt whatever merit is in good repute, and almost make it hateful with...
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The Normal Fifth Reader

Albert Newton Raub - Readers - 1878 - 416 pages
...noise and without confusion. They were carried home by their own carriages — that is to say, by the vehicles nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to their respective abodes, and took leave...
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