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" Nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to their respective abodes, and took leave of them with a hearty smack at the door; which, as it was an established... "
Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Page 365
1820
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Chambers's Cyclopędia of English Literature: A History ..., Volumes 5-6

Robert Chambers - Authors, American - 1880
...rnnfntlon. They were carried home by their own carnages — that fs to pay, hy the vehicles i.nture had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones lo their respective abodes, and took leave...
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Irving's Works: A history of New York

Washington Irving - 1882
...noise and without confusion. They were carried home by their own carriages, that is to say, by the vehicles nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to their respective abodes, and took leave...
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Development of English Literature and Language

Alfred Hix Welsh - English language - 1882
...noise and without confusion. They were carried home by their own carriages, — that is lo say, by the vehicles nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to Iheir respective abodes, and took leave...
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Swinton's Fifth Reader and Speaker

William Swinton - Readers - 1883 - 479 pages
...without noise or confusion. The guests were carried home by their own carriages ; that is to say, by the vehicles nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. 16. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to their respective abodes, and took leave...
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Swinton's Reader and Speaker, Volume 5

William Swinton - 1883
...without noise or confusion. The guests were carried home by their own carriages ; that is to say, by the vehicles nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. 16. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to their respective abodes, and took leave...
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Development of English Literature and Language, Volumes 1-2

Alfred Hix Welsh - English language - 1882
...the vehicles nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. B^B_B`B pleee of etiquette, done in perfect simplicity and honesty of heart, occasioned no scandal at that...
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Chambers's advanced reader [forming a 7th part to Chambers's graduated readers].

Chambers W. and R., ltd - 1885
...noise or confusion. The guests were carried home by their own carriages — that is to say, by the vehicles nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. CHAMBERS S ADVANCED READER. Slm-pli'-ci-ty, lit. one-foldness. From Lat. sim-, the same, and...
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A History of New York from the Beginning of the World to the End of the ...

Washington Irving - New York (State) - 1888 - 528 pages
...the vehicles nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to...perfect simplicity and honesty of heart, occasioned no scapdal at that time, nor should it at the present ; — if our great-grandfathers approved of the...
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Young Ladies' Illustrated Reader

Readers, American - 1889 - 436 pages
...were carried home by their own carriages—that is to say, by the vehicles nature had provided for them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to their respective abodes, and took leave...
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Slang and Its Analogues Past and Present: A Dictionary, Historical ..., Volume 6

William Ernest Henley - English language - 1903
...Beggars. Ilk SMACK still, did crack still, Just like a cadger's whip. 1809. IRVING, Hui. N. York, 171. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to...abodes, and took leave of them with a hearty SMACK. 1860. DICKENS, Uncom. Traveller, ' Titbull's Almshouses.' Heard the sound of a SMACK— a SMACK which...
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