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" Nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to their respective abodes, and took leave of them with a hearty smack at the door; which, as it was an established... "
Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Page 365
1820
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Gems of Genius in Poetry and Art: From the Kings and Queens of Thought : and ...

Frederick Saunders, Minnie K. Davis - American poetry - 1899 - 743 pages
...without confusion. They were carried home by their own carriages, that is to say, by the vehicles that Nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to their respective abodes, and took leave...
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Literature for Fifth-reader Grades ...

Sherman Williams - Readers - 1902
...noise and without confusion. They were carried home by their own carriages; that is to say, by the vehicles nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to their respective abodes, and took leave...
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The Fifth Reader

Readers, American - 1905 - 468 pages
...without noise and without confusion. They were carried home by their own carriages, that is to say by the vehicles Nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. WASHINGTON IRVING. Washington Irving, a genial and amiable writer, the first to win European...
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Masterpieces of the World's Best Literature, Volume 5

Jeannette Leonard Gilder - Literature - 1905
...noise and without confusion. They were carried home by their own carriages, that is to say, by the vehicles Nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to their respective abodes, and took leave...
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Knickerbocker's History of New York: (books III-VII)

Washington Irving - New York (State) - 1909 - 288 pages
...noise and without confusion. They were carried home by their own carriages, that is to say, by the vehicles nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to their respective 10 abodes, and took leave...
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The Literary Reader for Higher Grades, Book 6

Kate Forrest Oswell, Charles Benajah Gilbert - Readers - 1912 - 591 pages
...confusion. They were carried home by their own carriages, that is to say, by the vehicles nature had ieo provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to their respective abodes, and took leave...
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Story Hour Readings, Book 7

Ernest Clark Hartwell - Readers - 1921
...noise and without confusion. They were carried home by their own carriages ; that is to say, by the vehicles nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. — Knickerbocker's History of New York. 1. Read some passages in which Irving pokes fun at...
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Told in Story, American History: Book one, 1492-1815

Hamilton James Eckenrode - America - 1922 - 382 pages
...vehicles nature had provided them with, excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to...respective abodes and took leave of them with a hearty kiss. The women's hair was pomatumed back from their foreheads with a candle, and covered with a little...
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Literature and Life, Book 2

Edwin Almiron Greenlaw, William Harris Elson, Christine M. Keck - American literature - 1922
...vehicles Nature had provided them — excepting such of the wealthy as could afford to keep a wagon. The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to their respective abodes, and took leave of so them with a hearty smack at the door ; which, as it was an established piece of etiquette, done...
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The Edinburgh Monthly Review, Volume 5

1821
...and without confusion. They were carried home by their own carriages, that is to say, by the velucles nature had provided them, excepting such of the wealthy...The gentlemen gallantly attended their fair ones to tlieir respective abodes, and took leave of them with a hearty smack at the door ; which, as it was...
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